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Raising the Standard of Refrigerated Reliability

Phil Moeller | Vice President – Product Management, Refrigeration
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In just a little more than five years since its creation, the Copeland Scroll™ K5 compressor has set a high standard for efficiency and reliability in mission-critical refrigeration applications. Read the full article here.

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Based on enhancements to the proven Copeland Scroll compression platform, the innovative K5 quickly became a workhorse in supermarket refrigeration, restaurant walk-in coolers and process chillers used in plants and environmental chambers. Below are some of the reasons the K5 has become one of the most trusted compressors in refrigeration.

Proven reliability

The K5 offers up to 70 percent fewer moving parts than reciprocating compressors and features precision-machined scrolls that deliver high-efficiency operation. On-board CoreSense™ Diagnostics combined with both liquid and vapor injection capabilities help ensure optimum system performance in a variety of applications.

Energy efficiency

Optimized scrolls and motors deliver up to 10 percent efficiency gains over legacy Copeland Scroll compressors — with vapor injection on low-temperature models improving efficiency by up to 20 percent and system capacity by up to 50 percent. The addition of variable volume ratio (VVR) technology allows the compressor to run efficiently in high ambient environments and improves performance in low-condensing operation. Several case studies have shown the K5 can deliver significant energy-efficiency improvements in supermarket applications over semi-hermetic reciprocating compressors.

Precise temperature and capacity control

Digital compression technology provides precise case temperature control, improves product quality and minimizes frost accumulation. Simple digital modulation enables varying capacities for fluctuating refrigeration loads, while the K5’s continuous operation minimizes compressor starts/stops for added reliability, reduced maintenance and increased longevity.

Compact design and wide application range

Compared to its semi-hermetic counterparts, the K5’s compact design delivers enhanced application flexibility and helps improve serviceability throughout the lifecycle. The K5 line has been expanded to cover small- to large-capacity requirements in medium- and low-temperature applications and is certified for use with low-GWP, hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) alternatives R-448A and R-449A. In addition, our North American customers will be pleased to know that the K5 is now manufactured in the United States, helping to reduce lead times.

In the face of a major industry transitions and new challenges emerging quicker than ever, the K5 continues to help customers respond to changing market conditions. By evolving to address varying requirements and enabling enhanced operational strategies, the K5 is continuing to set the standard for reliability in mission-critical refrigeration applications.

The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens

Paul_Hepperla Paul Hepperla | Vice President, Solutions Integration – Foodservice

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

 

Join us our next E360 Webinar, “The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens” on Tuesday, December 11 at 2 p.m. EST / 11 a.m. PST.

The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens

It seems everywhere you turn and across multiple industries, companies are touting the promise that the internet of Things (IoT) will digitally transform their operations. The restaurant sector is no exception. In recent years, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and restaurant retailers have spent considerable time and effort figuring out how to leverage the power of connectivity in commercial kitchens.

While it’s relatively easy to conceptualize how the internet of things (IoT) could improve operational efficiencies and provide business value, bringing these ideas to fruition has proved more difficult. Too often, we see retailers make the jump to connecting assets without first having a clear idea of what problem they’re trying to solve, or how connectivity will fundamentally change the way their business operates. Then, once everything is connected, they’re left wondering: “What’s next?”

Our next E360 Webinar will examine why this is the case, and focus on how foodservice OEMs and retailers can work together to tap the seemingly limitless potential of IoT. My presentation, “The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens” will focus on these key points:

  • The importance of defining the scope and purpose of your connected project
  • An examination of the far-reaching and dramatic impacts to your business
  • Real-world examples of successful and failed connectivity projects
  • Evaluating business models that involve service contracts, recurring revenue or monetization

Another common problem with connected kitchen projects is underestimating the complexities inherent with these new business models. For example, a connected maintenance offering might require somewhat sophisticated coordination of not only OEM and end user roles, but also the inclusion of an authorized service provider. Frankly, these are the types of business relationships and interactions that are often overlooked when companies rush to exploit the power of IoT before thinking through the implications.

The webinar will look at these challenges from both OEM and retail perspectives. For an OEM, it’s critically important to understand their customers’ business needs before launching a connected initiative. Similarly, retailers need to realize that without involving and engaging their OEM partners in their connected kitchen strategy, they’re not likely to achieve the maximum potential of their IoT solution.

So, if you’re thinking about entering into a connected kitchen project or IoT business model in the restaurant sector, register now to gain a better understanding of the risks and rewards of connectivity.

How to Create the Perfect Climate in Supermarkets

ronchapek_2 Ron Chapek | Director of Product Management/Enterprise Software

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I recently participated in an article for Winsight Grocery Business, which discussed the importance of keeping refrigeration and HVAC systems in harmony. Click here to read the full article.

How to Create the Perfect Climate in Supermarkets

Refrigeration and HVAC costs are among the biggest operational expenses a supermarket faces. The reasons? People create warmth. Refrigeration creates cold. Humidity creates wetness. And in supermarkets, HVAC systems constantly struggle to maintain the right temperature and humidity for people, equipment and products. With proper management and planning, supermarket operators can balance these factors and even optimize HVAC and refrigeration systems to work in coordination with each other.

 The battle between HVAC and refrigeration

In most buildings, the job of an HVAC system is to maintain a comfortable indoor temperature for customers and staff. But HVAC systems face unique challenges in supermarkets. Coolers, refrigerated display cases, freezers and other units (particularly those without doors), pour cool, dry air into stores. This isolated cold air stresses HVAC systems year-round, as they have to increase heating during winter — burning a lot of energy — while leaving uncomfortably cold spots, even in summer. Your refrigeration equipment alters an HVAC load in ways most systems aren’t designed to handle.

Adding doors or replacing open units can reduce both the load and energy costs. But adding doors creates a different problem: they often fog up — which forces shoppers to open the doors to see what’s inside — defeating the whole purpose of having a door. Fog and frost occur when humid weather, steamy shoppers and chilly air collide.

A foggy situation

Door fogging is a symptom of a very tricky problem: keeping in-store relative humidity (RH) at the proper percentage. If humidity is too high, doors fog over and cooling coils frost up, forcing units to overwork. If the humidity gets even higher, water can condense on floors, walls and even dry-goods packaging. But if the RH is too low, the overly dry air can shorten the shelf life of fresh produce or wilt it.

Moisture, relatively

Almost all the humidity inside a store comes from moister outside air, and it’s up to HVAC systems to lower that humidity to a slightly dry 45 percent RH — and that’s not easy.

The simplest way to do this is to super-chill incoming outside air, because as air cools, its humidity drops. But this wastes energy in two ways: it increases the refrigeration load on the HVAC and can chill the entire store. So, the air first has to be reheated before entering the store, producing yet another energy expense.

Another option to use a desiccant system in the HVAC unit to remove moisture. These systems are effective and reliable, but they require a lot of energy, especially for large spaces like supermarkets.

Harvest-free heat

The article describes a simpler, cheaper solution. The compressors on your refrigeration equipment generate a lot of heat as they compress refrigerants. This excessive heat is usually vented outside the building, wasting a source of free heat. Today, systems can recycle, treat and mix this hot air to create ideal store temperatures and RH — at much lower overall costs.

Advanced systems harvest excess hot air in various ways. Some use the hot vented air instead of the HVAC heater to reheat super-cooled, dehumidified air and reduce reheating costs. Some systems use heat exchangers to recycle the vented hot air to heat a supermarket during cold weather. “Single-path” systems super-chill a limited volume of humid outside air to dry it, then mix it with uncooled air to produce just the right temperature/RH mix. Another system uses two cooling coils, one to cool the hot air as it’s being vented outside, so it can mix with outside air to reach optimal temperature and RH. The incoming air needs little heating or cooling as it reaches the second coil, which greatly reduces the workload on the HVAC system.

Instead of adding to your HVAC system’s workload, your refrigeration equipment can actually help reduce the load, lower your costs, and create the ideal climate for shoppers, employees and facility managers.

 

Five Reasons Why We <3 STEM Every Day

Ed_McKiernan Ed McKiernan | President, Cold Chain, Electronics & Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

 

Five Reasons Why We STEM Every Day

Today is National STEM Day. For those who may not know, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) is a national coalition aimed at preserving America’s place as a global technological leader by focusing on educational principles that help students learn and excel in those four subjects. While we join in today’s celebration, STEM is a continual, dedicated area of focus at Emerson. You might even say it’s in our DNA.

So, on this day, we’d like to take a look at why STEM is important to the futures of our children, company and country.

  1. Educational empowerment — first and foremost, STEM is about empowering our children to overcome the stigmas often associated with its curriculum — from being too complex to being reserved only for the academically exceptional — while inspiring interest in STEM careers. Doing so will require STEM activities to be more accessible, engaging and mainstream. Simply put: it means making STEM cool again.
  2. Closing the gender gap — today less than 50 percent of females are encouraged to pursue STEM careers. To ensure equal career opportunities and earning potentials, we need to inspire their interest in STEM from a young age and provide pathways that lead to long STEM careers.
  3. Technological transformation — in an era where technology is transforming nearly every aspect of our lives, STEM skills are more relevant than ever. Nowhere is this more evident than in the HVAC&R industries. Service technician jobs are becoming more technological than mechanical; architectures that drive these systems are rapidly changing; and electronics and digital controls are permeating every aspect of their operations.
  4. More data = more science — an abundance of data is changing the way systems (such as HVAC&R) are maintained, operated and optimized. This brings the role of data scientists to the forefront with their abilities to write the algorithms that process this data, detect trends and anomalies, and even predict issues before they happen.
  5. Making up lost groundthere’s no question that the U.S. has fallen behind other countries in STEM-related skillsets and disciplines. It’s time to bring these competencies and spirit of innovation back to our shores to help usher in the next generation of technical know-how in an increasingly connected, global economy.

Emerson has been a champion of the STEM program for many years, so National STEM Day holds a special place in our hearts. We believe STEM is good not only for our children’s development, but also the prosperity of our country. In recent years, we’ve seen the rapid advancement of technology in our shared industries, and there’s no sign of this pace slowing down in the foreseeable future. STEM is vital in ensuring that the U.S. continues to set this pace and preserve our place at the global technological table.

Introducing the New E360 Content Hub!

The new E360 Content Hub consolidates our vast library of articles, case studies, white papers, videos, presentations and webinar archives in one place. You can access directly at Climate.Emerson.com/E360ContentHub.

Ed_McKiernan Ed McKiernan | President, Cold Chain, Electronics & Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Introducing the New E360 Content Hub

 

Quickly find the topics you’re looking for in one place

In 2014, we launched the E360 initiative to facilitate an industry-wide dialogue that would foster collaboration among stakeholders and address the many challenges facing HVACR today. Since that time, we’ve explored myriad topics which cover a full spectrum of issues and applications that our customers encounter at various points along the food cold chain. This has allowed us to amass a wealth of valuable, informative materials in a variety of formats — from articles, case studies and white papers to videos, presentations and webinars. With the introduction of our new E360 Content Hub, we’re happy to announce that all of these materials are in one place — with neither a charge nor subscription requirements for you.

Multiple ways to search for topics

By aggregating our vast library of E360 resource materials into one place, we’re providing easy access to in-depth industry information in multiple ways. The hub is designed to give you the ability to browse topics related to your specific areas of interest, or perform a targeted search. To help you find what you’re seeking, we’ve organized topics according to industry, topic, product or content type. Under each category you’ll find content further organized into the following relevant sub-categories.

Industry sub-categories:

  • Aftermarket
  • Convenience Store
  • Distribution and Transportation
  • Food Retail and Grocery
  • Mixed Retail
  • Processing and Industrial
  • Restaurants
  • Waste Disposal

Topic sub-categories:

  • Connectivity, IoT and Insights
  • Energy, Utility and Power Management
  • Food Quality and Safety
  • Innovation
  • Maintenance and Repair
  • Refrigerants and Refrigeration Systems
  • Regulations
  • Safety
  • Sustainability
  • Trends

Product sub-categories:

  • Apps, Software and Services
  • Cargo Tracking
  • Commercial Refrigeration
  • Facility Controls and Electronics
  • Industrial Refrigeration
  • Monitoring Solutions
  • Temperature Management

As we continue on this E360 journey together, we will continue to facilitate this important industry dialogue and develop the content that helps us all understand and address the challenges before us. Whether you’re at your computer or on your smartphone, the E360 Content Hub puts the latest developments in HVACR and the food cold chain at your fingertips.

So be sure to add this site to your list of favorites, and welcome to the E360 Content Hub: our industry’s most robust and comprehensive information repository.

 

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