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Posts from the ‘E360 Forum’ Category

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

RajanRajendran2 Rajan Rajendran | V.P., System Innovation Center and Sustainability

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

As the phasedown of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants continues globally, the United States currently lacks a federal mandate with which to govern their use in both AC and commercial refrigeration. Instead, several state-led initiatives and proposals are driving sustainability measures now in the U.S. At a recent E360 breakfast at the AHR event, I co-hosted an industry discussion with Jennifer Butsch, Emerson’s regulatory affairs manager of air conditioning, on the latest developments in refrigerant regulations and rulemaking.

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

Gauging from the level of interest from those who attended, the U.S. regulatory climate is an important topic for industry stakeholders. With dynamic developments taking place along state and federal lines, it’s more important than ever to stay informed and engage with any efforts to steer these evolving regulations in the direction of regulatory uniformity.

From Kigali to the EPA to the U.S. Climate Alliance

The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol remains the global force behind the phasedown of HFCs. Currently, more than 90 countries — not including the U.S. — have ratified this international treaty and plan to follow its recommendations to reduce the use of HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential (GWP). In the U.S., the rollback of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Significant New Alternative Policy (SNAP) Rules 20 and 21 has deregulated the use of these HFCs from a federal perspective.

Even though SNAP Rules 20 and 21 have been vacated, today they serve as the regulatory framework for a growing number of states in the U.S. Climate Alliance — which currently is comprised of 25 member states representing 55 percent of the national population and $11.7 trillion in economic contributions. Among these, California, Washington, Vermont and New Jersey legally have adopted SNAP Rules 20 and 21, with five additional states proposing similar measures. Their charter is committed to “implementing policies that advance the goals of the Paris Agreement, aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26-28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.”

While these new states share a common regulatory framework, enforcement dates of refrigerant phasedowns per application vary from state to state. Although the industry recognizes the states’ sovereignty to take environmental action, we also urge consistency in approach and enforcement to reduce complexity. Imagine the challenge for contractors covering a multi-state territory where each state has different enforcement dates. This is the type of complexity that we should strive to avoid as an industry.

All eyes on CARB proposals

Not only was California the first state to adopt SNAP Rules 20 and 21 — which have already taken effect — its California Air Resources Board (CARB) has mandated 40 percent HFC emissions reductions from the state’s 2013 baseline levels by 2030. To date, California has taken the most aggressive environmental stance of any of the U.S. Climate Alliance states, and in many ways, is creating the path forward for other states to follow. This is precisely why it’s so important for industry stakeholders in all states to pay close attention to active proposals and engage in any opportunities to comment on the nature of proposed rulemaking.

Currently, the following CARB proposals for AC and chiller applications are open for additional industry input and comments:

AC

  • 750 GWP limit for new residential and non-residential, air-conditioning equipment, effective Jan. 1, 2023

Chillers and process chillers

  • 750 GWP limit for new chillers designed for a minimum evaporator temperature > -15 °F, effective Jan. 1, 2024
  • 2,200 GWP limit for new process chillers designed for a minimum evaporator temperature between -15 °F and -58 °F, effective Jan. 1, 2024

For the commercial refrigeration sector, CARB’s proposals have evolved to consider the challenges facing operators of existing food retail facilities by introducing the option of meeting a company-wide weighted average GWP or achieving a 55 percent reduction in Greenhouse Gas Potential (GHGp).

New commercial refrigeration

  • 150 GWP limit for new, non-residential refrigeration equipment containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant, effective Jan. 1, 2022

Companies owning or operating 20 or more retail food facilities

  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 2,500 GWP or achieve a 25 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2026
  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 1,400 GWP or achieve a 55 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2030

Companies owning or operating fewer than 20 retail food facilities

  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 1,400 GWP or achieve a 55 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2030

CARB has asked the industry for input and comments on these proposals, which are expected to be finalized later this year. It’s critically important to review the details, definitions and exceptions to these proposed rules in order to gain a clear understanding of how they might impact you and provide informed feedback to help steer the rulemaking process.

New federal HFC bills on the horizon

With the EPA no longer authorized to regulate HFC use, the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives have each penned new bills that would put the EPA in alignment with the Kigali Amendment and restore the EPA’s authority to phase down the production and consumption of HFCs over a 15-year period.

  • Senate: American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2019 (S2754)
  • House: American Innovation Leadership Act of 2020 (HR5544)

While the future and timing of these new bills are uncertain, they offer the potential to re-establish a federal standard for HFC management, including guidelines for servicing, recovery, recycling and reclamation. In the best-case scenario, these could provide the industry guidance that individual states need to move forward with a unified approach, remove the legislative burden from the states, and reduce regulatory complexity.

Download our full AHR breakfast presentation to learn more about proposed refrigerant rulemaking and how to prepare for regulations in your region.

Shedding Light on Food Safety During the Cold Chain Journey

MattToone_2 Matt Toone | Vice President, Sales & Solutions – Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Whether you’re a convenience store (c-store) operator, quick-service restaurant (QSR), or a fast casual or fine dining establishment, ensuring food quality and safety is imperative to your success. In this blog, the second of a three-part series based on a recent E360 article, Minimizing Food Safety Risks From Farm to Fork, I explore the environmental factors and conditions putting food at risk as well as the food safety regulatory landscape.

Shedding Light on Food Safety During the Cold Chain Journey

About one in six Americans contracts a foodborne illness every year. That’s 48 million people, or roughly the population of the New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Dallas metropolitan areas combined.

For a restaurant or c-store, a single outbreak of foodborne illness can result in thousands (or even millions) of dollars in fines. Add to that the potential for damage to your brand, and it can easily take years to recover from an incident.

The challenge for foodservice operators is that they are stationed at the end of a very long cold chain. That’s why it’s essential for them to understand how and where food safety and quality are most at risk. Armed with this knowledge, they will be better positioned to ensure that food is safe upon receipt.

Multiple factors put food safety at risk

From production and processing to transportation and cold storage, it can take days or even weeks for food to journey from farms to kitchens. At every point in that process, food safety can be compromised.

Harvesting practices can accelerate food spoilage. Improper processing and unsafe handling can introduce bacterial pathogens, such as E. coli and listeria, into the cold chain. Cross-contamination during shipping, storage and handling can amplify the risk of foodborne illness.

Unsurprisingly, temperature also plays a major — and sometimes overlooked — role in food safety. Optimal temperature ranges for produce, meats, dairy and frozen foods must be strictly maintained throughout the cold chain to preserve food quality. Deviations at any point can be an invitation for bacterial growth, not to mention a shorter shelf life.

Of course, operators have no control over how food is handled or stored prior to receipt. But that doesn’t make them any less susceptible to bad headlines should an outbreak occur under their watch. What they can and should do is meticulously review data logs prior to receipt to ensure the shipments were maintained at optimal conditions. And until the food is sold to a customer, operators must continue to ensure they are following safe food storage and handling practices in their own kitchens.

Managing regulatory expectations

With so much at stake, it’s easy to see why foodservice is such a tightly regulated industry. For restaurants and c-stores, though, this means an ever-higher bar on food safety and quality standards. As a result, operators must understand and navigate a new landscape of transparency and traceability. This is especially true as the regulatory focus increasingly shifts from reactive measures to proactive prevention. Going forward, operators at all links in the cold chain can expect greater requirements for monitoring and documenting food safety.

But there’s good news for foodservice operators: technology is on their side. Advances in refrigeration science, increased automation and the rise of internet of things (IoT) technologies are making it easier than ever to manage, maintain and monitor consistent temperature controls within the cold chain. Moreover, with more data available, operators have greater visibility into the conditions their food was subjected to on its long journey. As a result, they will be less “in the dark” about the products they stake their brands on.

We’ll explore this further in my next blog, which will focus on the cold chain journey and the technologies that are putting improved food safety within reach.

E360 Breakfast at AHR: HVACR Refrigerants & Regulations Discussion

RajanRajendran2 Rajan Rajendran | V.P., System Innovation Center and Sustainability

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Before the doors open at the AHR Expo on February 4, join us at 8 a.m. for an interactive E360 Breakfast discussion on HVACR refrigerants and regulations. You’ll hear about several industry trends to keep your eyes on over the next few years.

E360 Breakfast at AHR: HVACR Refrigerants & Regulations Discussion

Refrigerant regulations are in constant flux, making it extremely difficult to stay current on the latest changes and information. Emerson’s regulation experts, Rajan Rajendran and Jennifer Butsch will highlight some of the latest regulatory updates and refrigerant options to help get you up to speed.

In addition, Emerson’s Ken Monnier will explore several industry trends that could potentially impact you over the next decade.

During this interactive discussion, you’ll have opportunities to ask some of your most pressing questions and share thoughts on measures that attendees might leverage to address today’s challenges.

E360 Breakfast: HVACR Refrigerants & Regulations Discussion

When                                                   Where

Tuesday, February 4                         Orange County Convention Center

8 – 9:30 a.m.                                     Room: W205 (West Concourse), Level II

9800 International Drive

Orlando, FL  32819

Afterward, you’ll be ready to hit the AHR Expo floor. We hope your first stop is the Emerson booth (#2101), where you can take a close look at some of our exciting technologies:

 

  • Copeland™ AWEF compliant condensing units for walk-In coolers and freezers — take energy efficiency regulations out of the equation with condensing units certified to meet AWEF requirements.
  • Copeland Scroll™ Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series learn how precise temperature control and significant energy savings are made possible with latest innovation in variable capacity modulation technology.
  • Copeland™ Modular Indoor Solution — see how our AHR Innovation Award finalist provides an all-in-one micro-distributed solution for food retailers, restaurants and convenience stores with display cases and walk-in boxes.
  • Supervisory Controls — learn why retailers large and small rely on this total-facility platform to monitor, optimize and control their refrigeration systems, HVAC, lighting and more.
  • Connect+ Enterprise Management Software — get an inside look at our newest IoT-enabled software suite designed provide advanced operational efficiencies across a multi-site retail network.

Register now to reserve your seat at this informative, idea-filled E360 Breakfast — a great way to start your day at AHR!

 

[Webinar Recap] Four Best Practices in Enterprise Optimization

ronchapek_2 Ron Chapek | Director of Product Management

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

For large retailers with multi-site store networks, there are significant advantages to using alarm management services and enterprise software — from reducing operational costs and preserving food quality and safety to lowering maintenance costs and improving energy efficiency. In a recent E360 Webinar, Best Practices in Enterprise and Facility Optimization, I talked with Scott Fritz, Emerson’s director of enterprise services & IT operations, about the keys to maximizing performance in these critical areas. View the webinar in its entirety and continue reading to learn more.

The process of managing assets, food inventories, service requirements and energy efficiency at an enterprise level involves a variety of stakeholders, including store managers, service technicians, alarm technicians, facility managers, energy managers and food safety managers. Companies need both the proper tools and strategies to effectively coordinate these resources and manage their collective efforts.

The following four best practices are designed to leverage enterprise software and services to help your company achieve its critical business objectives.

1. Gain a centralized view of operations. Today, multi-site retailers are tasked with managing large asset and equipment portfolios — such as aging HVAC, lighting and refrigeration systems — and an ever-increasing number of “smart” assets connected via the internet of things (IoT). Enterprise software offers a centralized view and management of these critical assets, enabling remote support, user access controls and network-wide broadcast of changes (such as refrigeration and HVAC setpoints and lighting schedules).

By optimizing facilities management and controlling setpoint data, large enterprises — such as a supermarket with 250 sites — can achieve up to $1M annually in operational labor savings.

2. Establish effective alarm management. Keeping a network of sites and their assets performing optimally requires the abilities to mitigate costly failures, save energy, and ensure food safety. But with virtually thousands of issues to sort through at any given time, this is no small task. Alarm management services allow companies to filter out the noise of countless non-essential alarms and prioritize critical issues. These timely and pertinent notifications accelerate issue resolution and prevent their potentially negative consequences.

For example, by avoiding food loss and delaying the “shrink” of perishable items, companies can save more than $2M annually.

3. Enable remote access. Service technicians and maintenance teams are running increasingly lean, with a scarcity of available new talent to replace an aging workforce. Enterprise software enables remote field connectivity to service issues via intuitive software that can be accessed on handheld computers and mobile devices. Having access to this data helps technicians evaluate and troubleshoot issues remotely — often eliminating the need for service calls (i.e., truck rolls) — while serving as a real-time training tool for new technicians.

The reduction of unnecessary truck rolls and service calls across an enterprise can save up to $1.5M annually.

4. Automate setpoint and energy management. Facilities managers are under increasing pressure to meet myriad day-to-day commitments — all while trying to achieve their profitability targets and reduce their liabilities and risks. Enterprise software with predictive analytics capabilities can help automate the compliance of critical operating parameters — such as refrigeration and HVAC setpoints — and deliver insights that facilities managers can leverage to make informed decisions.

By deploying setpoint management tools that ensure continuous commissioning of equipment and establishing processes to maintain optimal energy levels, companies can achieve up to a $2.7M reduction in annual energy spend.

By following these four best practices, companies can transform the productivity, energy efficiency and overall optimization of their enterprise operations. Emerson has the enterprise software, alarm management services and domain expertise to help large supermarket and restaurant chains optimize their multi-site store networks. View this webinar in its entirely to learn more.

 

Protecting Food on the Move

AmyChildress Amy Childress | Vice President of Marketing & Planning, Cargo Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

The cold chain in perishable food distribution is a complex and delicate thing. Just one hour out of optimum temperature range can have significant impact on a product’s shelf life. More serious cold chain lapses can pose waste, food safety and environmental issues, causing businesses and entire industries financial and reputational harm. At the E360 Forum in Houston last fall, I shared common cold chain pitfalls, real-world case studies and best practices for successfully navigating this complicated process. Read more below, then view the full E360 Forum presentation.

Those blueberries on your cereal? They’re from Chili. That orange? South Africa. Today’s food travels incredible distances to get to you. And behind your grilled salmon supper, there’s a dizzying array of complex cold chain management and monitoring that needs to happen to get it to your table — safe and tasty.

Industry experts say that from farm (or ocean) to your fork, there can be as many as 15–20 transfer points (hand-offs) in the cold chain process, encompassing trucks, containers and even planes. Each stop increases the risk of food safety incidences, spoilage and lost profits.

What’s at stake when the cold chain breaks?

Food and resource waste

One of the more frustrating things to me is the amount of time, money and resources spent producing food and getting it to where it needs to go — only to have it spoil by the time it gets to the point of sale. Think of all the work, expenses, fuel and greenhouse gas emissions it requires to get product from California to the East Coast. When there’s a break in the cold chain, all of that time, effort and money could potentially be lost.

According to Food Foolish by John Mandyck and Eric Schultz, the amount of food waste in the supply and distribution of food is staggering. They estimate that:

  • 1 billion metric tons of food is lost or wasted each year
  • One-third of food produced each year is never eaten
  • 800 million people in the world are chronically hungry

In addition, food waste has a devastating impact on the environment in terms of water waste and the creation of greenhouse gases. Mandyck and Schultz go on to say: “If food waste were a country by itself, it would be the third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases behind China and the U.S.”

Financial impacts

I don’t need to tell you there’s big money in each trailer transporting food commodities across the country and around the world. If there’s a break in the cold chain, the financial impacts can be painful. Check out the food value estimate per truckload:

  • Beef — $150,000 to $250,000
  • Poultry — $60,000 to $225,000
  • Pork — $80,000
  • Strawberries — $20,000
  • Bananas — $16,000

Food safety and public health

According to the CDC, about 48 million people (1 in 6 Americans) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die each year from foodborne diseases. Not all issues are directly attributable to compromised cold chain processes. But with elevated temperatures, a very small situation can grow exponentially in a very short time. By properly managing temperature, you can mitigate and isolate a potential food incident before it can spread.

Conquering the cold chain

We know what can go wrong when temperatures aren’t right. But how can broken links in the cold chain be prevented? To answer that, here are a few best practices for facilitating good temperatures in transit.

  • Start with appropriate pre-cooling processes. Remove field heat from product as soon as possible, pre-cool containers, and “pulp” or take product temperature to ensure it’s at the correct setpoint.
  • Follow proper loading practices for optimal air circulation.
  • Establish and communicate proper transport temperatures; pay attention to mixed loads.
  • Employ independent temperature-monitoring devices and proper placement procedures.
  • Check temperature history and place immediately into cold storage at the distribution center.

Transport from the distribution center to the retailer needs to be closely monitored as well. In fact, this is one of the areas where we see the most breakdowns: the transfer at the final point of sale. Deliveries typically come in very late and perishables are not put into cold storage quick enough.

Baked bananas and blockchain

One of our customers recently shared a story about a load of bananas they received. The retailer was using one of our real-time monitoring devices and knew before the containers were unloaded that bananas had basically cooked in transit. Armed with real-time temperature data, they declined the shipment, saving $28,000 on two loads — loads they may have previously accepted.

Digital time and temperature loggers, real-time trackers with proactive alerts have been a part of perishable loads in transit for years. As illustrated by the story above, they have been instrumental in identifying temperature flux and allow retailers and suppliers to be more preventive and proactive.

Emerson is leading exciting developments in analytics based on aggregated data from these devices. Vast amounts of in-transit time, location and temperature intelligence are now stored in the cloud — and can be tapped for deeper cold chain insights on best routes, carriers, shipping lanes and suppliers.

Another technology getting a lot of industry buzz is blockchain. (It’s not just for cryptocurrency.) Blockchain offers an incredibly secure platform to share deep and detailed data across all the supply chain players. It lets disparate, previously siloed, entities share common, unalterable data on a common framework. We’re currently working with IBM to create food freshness applications and shelf-life predictors that could be shared across the blockchain platform. And that’s only the beginning.

To hear more best practices, cold chain success stories and even a few cautionary tales, be sure to view the full E360 Forum presentation here.

 

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