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Posts from the ‘E360 Forum’ Category

Add the Houston E360 Forum to Your Calendar This October

Dean Landeche_Blog Dean Landeche | Marketing Cold Chain Leader
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

JOIN US in HOUSTON, TX, for our next free E360 Forum on Thursday, October 25 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency North Houston hotel.

E360 Forum blogEverything is bigger in Texas, right? We’re excited to bring our next E360 Forum to the Lone Star State. This year has seen regulatory changes, evolving technologies, emerging trends and more. At this daylong event, we want to hear how you’ve stayed in step with the pace of change. From sustainability initiatives to the rise of smart technology and data-driven decision making, we’ll explore the industry as it is today and examine where it is headed in the future.

The day will be comprised of informative keynote sessions and a panel discussion in the morning with the afternoon open for you to choose from three relevant and interactive breakout sessions. These sessions are designed to give you a chance to have your questions answered and to join in a dialogue with industry experts and your peers.

Houston’s breakout session tracks will focus on refrigeration in food retail, store operations/facility optimization and cold chain management followed by a closing group session on upgrading your existing refrigeration infrastructure.

The goal of this E360 Forum is to evaluate 2018’s trends and tackle the biggest challenges in commercial refrigeration and air conditioning.

What you’ll learn:

  • The latest refrigerant and regulatory updates
  • What’s on the horizon in supermarket power management
  • Trends in supermarket architectures
  • Supermarket upgrades that impact energy efficiency and cost savings
  • How to protect food throughout the cold chain
  • Air management, rooftop efficiency and energy savings strategies for air conditioning

E360 Forums are proven to be invaluable events, providing you with opportunities for one-on-one discussions with experts and peers. Immediately following the event, attendees and presenters can mingle at a networking reception from 4–5:15 p.m. We hope you’ll make plans today to add Houston’s E360 Forum to your list of can’t-miss industry events in 2018.

Understanding Applications for Alternative Refrigerants

jasonprenger Jason Prenger | Refrigeration Engineering Director

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Emerson’s tests* of leading alternative refrigerants suggest challenges as well as benefits. The full video details theoretical calculations and real-world tests.

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Emerson sees migration to lower-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants as inevitable. Here are some challenges leading A1 alternatives may face, and how to potentially address them.

Heat of Compression

While new HFCs for R-404A offer a lower GWP, alternatives run significantly hotter in both low- and medium-temperature conditions. Compressor cooling will be needed in many low-temperature applications. This is potentially a big deal because some freezer applications can no longer run with non-liquid injected compressors. Full operating envelope capabilities are still possible with liquid injection, but this will likely require additional plumbing and power.

For low-pressure refrigerants, potential replacements for R-134A run at lower discharge temperatures, so there is less of a temperature concern. Our tests* have found the entire operating envelope for R-134A can be achieved with either 450A or 513A.

Capacity and Size

R-404A replacements typically deliver less capacity, especially in low-temperature applications, which will require larger compressors to match existing systems.

During our tests*, traditional HFC refrigerants like R-404A also had little or no temperature glide, so they didn’t affect system sizing. Emerging A1 replacements, however, have glide values of ~5 to ~8 °F. That potentially creates issues when calculating capacity that most of our industry hasn’t had to deal with in the past. Capacity at the midpoint in a medium-temperature system with R-404A, for example, isn’t much different from its dew point compressor rating. But an R-448A system would deliver 3 percent more capacity at the same conditions.

This is even more apparent in low-temperature systems. For example, if you’re sizing an R-448A system off dew point, you might expect capacity loss of 19.4 percent compared to R-404A. In reality, the system sees a drop of about 13.9 percent. While you’ll still have to increase the size of the compressor, using the midpoint can significantly affect your calculations.

In medium-temperature applications, the weighted Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) of newer alternatives is similar to R-404A. In lower-temperature applications, there are trade-offs between efficiency and GWP. R-407A compares well with R-404A, but has a higher GWP than other alternatives. R-448A scores better on GWP, but requires more injection and power.

There’s little or no temperature glide in replacements for R-134A, but of the two main candidates, 513A meets or exceeds the capacity of R-134A, while 450A struggles in comparison.

Update on A2L/A3 Refrigerants

This presentation touched only briefly on A2L refrigerants, since they have yet to be listed as acceptable alternatives under the Environmental Protection Agency’s Significant New Alternatives Policy. However, Emerson continued testing functionality for A2Ls and the A3 R-290 throughout 2017. If you have any questions about these refrigerants, or want any evaluations done, please contact us to learn more about your options.

The full video details theoretical calculations and real-world tests.

*The results presented in this post are based on Emerson testing. Results may vary based on additional testing and application.

 

R-290 in U.S. Commercial Foodservice

AllenWicher Allen Wicher | Director, Foodservice Marketing

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

 

Many factors are lining up to help make the case for R-290, from demographics and sustainability to regulations. Watch the full video for more on overcoming common challenges, and to learn how one company, H&K International, successfully made the shift to focusing on R-290-based products.

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Regardless of the EPA’s current or future actions, Emerson sees a significant market dynamic toward sustainability, lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) and higher efficiency — especially in the spaces where     R-290 is acceptable for use.

R-290 is a natural, hydrocarbon-based substance. In addition to its low GWP of 3 and Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) of 0, Emerson’s compressor test labs* found that R-290 yields more than 20 percent better Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) on average compared to R-404A and other HFCs. R-290 systems have been found by many to be highly reliable. Hydrocarbons can be used in multiple applications such as secondary systems, self-contained cases and condensing units.

The current charge limit for R-290 is only 150 grams, which can limit unit size and potentially create significant challenges for makers of stand-alone, medium-temperature reach-ins. Manufacturers of larger equipment are also understandably reluctant to take on the inefficiencies of supporting multiple refrigerants in their lineups.

Emerson is participating on the AHRI Flammable Refrigerants Research Subcommittee which will be investigating the impact of R-290 refrigerant charge limit increases. Increasing the charge limits could open up more applications in ice, commercial reach-ins, and potentially in some packaged solutions. The Subcommittee intends on submitting the results of its investigation for use in evaluating Codes and Standard revisions for IEC, UL, ASHRAE and others.

Most ultra-low-GWP refrigerants (A2L or A3 with a GWP less than 150) have some level of flammability, which may create some challenges. That said, R-290 systems tend to be reliable when proper protocols and procedures are followed. Integrated cases and packaged walk-in systems can use multiple 150g refrigeration systems in a single appliance. These have low- and medium-temperature applications that help to address today’s EPA and DOE compliance challenges, though DOE test procedures are still in development.

H&K International offers a compelling real-world example of the benefits R-290 offers to commercial foodservice. In the United States alone, the company projects its customers will save more than $769,000 in utility costs over the next three years, with additional savings each year R-290 equipment is in operation.

Watch the full video for more on overcoming common challenges, and to learn how one company, H&K International, successfully made the shift to focusing on R-290-based products.

* The results presented in this post are based on Emerson’s testing. Results may vary based on additional testing and application.

The Impacts of Technology and CO2 on the Future of System Architecture

DerekGosselin_Blog-Title Derek Gosselin | Technical Product Support Director

Hillphoenix

I recently spoke at Emerson’s Chicago’s E360 Forum and spelled out the challenges and benefits of CO2 systems. For a complete look at the costs and opportunities, we encourage you to watch the full presentation.

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Regulatory changes to the use of refrigerants are creating difficult business decisions — and more change is coming. Reducing Global Warming Potential (GWP) is going to be an issue, so it’s worth looking at how this industry trend may influence your refrigeration strategies.

HFC/HFO blends lower GWP, but only moderately. In contrast, CO2 is a zero-ozone depleting natural refrigerant that has a GWP of 1. Non-toxic and non-flammable, it’s classified as an A1 refrigerant by ASHRAE. In today’s uncertain environment, it offers a potentially future-proof solution to your long-term plans. You won’t have to retrofit out of CO2.

Because CO2 is more efficient, it has more cooling capacity. That allows you to have smaller compressors and line sizes, reduce installation, and use less refrigerant within a store.

Best of all, the technology isn’t new. CO2 already has a majority of the market share in Europe. Since 2013, the total number of CO2 transcritical booster systems in North America has grown from 30 to 310. More than 60 of these systems are located in warmer climates, operating efficiently with just a few modifications.

CO2 system costs are also coming down, thanks to the growing involvement of OEMs, wholesalers, contractors and end users.

When considering CO2, understand the total cost of ownership. The lower first cost of traditional HFC systems offers only one-time savings. While CO2 systems have higher first cost, their lower installed cost and lower energy and maintenance costs offer savings annually throughout their lifecycles. Some organizations are even lowering first costs by collaborating with local energy utilities to secure rebates and incentives.

For a complete look at the costs and opportunities, we encourage you to watch the full presentation.

 

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