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Posts from the ‘E360’ Category

The Compact Digital X-Line Series Is Changing the Game for Small-Format Retailers

Julie Havenar | Product Manager – Condensing Units
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

The abilities of small-format food retailers and restaurants to maximize energy savings and refrigeration reliability just keep getting better. Our latest E360 Product Spotlight on the Copeland Scroll™ Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series highlights how Emerson is helping to provide operators with more control over their energy bills and food safety needs.

Evaluating Supermarket Energy Management Strategies

When it comes to refrigeration strategies, creative planning is key for small-format supermarkets, convenience stores and foodservice establishments. For these operations, finding the space — both physically and fiscally —to install and maintain standard industry condensing units can require balancing acts, tradeoffs and expensive workarounds.

The Copeland Scroll Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series is changing the equation. Designed specifically for small-format operations, it delivers more precise refrigeration, longer-lasting equipment and lower energy bills. Just as important, its lightweight, slim footprint offers unmatched installation flexibility for space-constrained operations.

Ideal for walk-in coolers, display cases and food preparation areas, the digital X-Line Series combines compression technology with variable-speed fan motor control, large-capacity condenser coils, and smart protection and diagnostics. By building on the Copeland Scroll and X-Line outdoor condensing unit platforms, Emerson packaged its field-proven technology specifically for confined locations and demanding refrigeration requirements.

Superior efficiency and temperature control

The digital X-Line Series enables operators to maintain food at optimum temperature — which can help to lessen food waste, improve food safety and quality while lowering their bottom line. The unit’s superior cooling and energy efficiency are achieved through digital modulation, which maintains much tighter control of case temperatures. Continuous capacity modulation from 20 to 100 percent further reduces compressor cycling and decreases energy consumption. For operators, this translates into:

  • Substantial annual improvements in energy efficiency
  • Longer equipment life
  • Improved product integrity
  • Higher confidence in food quality and safety

Exceptional reliability and performance safeguards

Built-in CoreSense™ diagnostics and protection helps to safeguard against compressor failures by quickly communicating errors to service technicians. The self-diagnosing system also can make changes to avoid failure, further securing product safety and minimizing equipment downtime.

Inherent installation flexibility

With its slim chassis, lightweight design and wall-mount option, the digital X-Line Series provides greater flexibility for where and how units are installed. This allows operators to maximize their available space while mitigating installation costs. The digital X-line Series is typically tied to multiple evaporators across various applications.

Ultra-quiet operation

Size isn’t the only factor that limits options. As operators on tight sites and in urban locations well know, noise can also restrict unit selection and placement. But that’s not the case with the digital X-Line Series, which was strategically designed for quiet operation. With noise levels that are practically undetectable, the digital X-Line Series is a natural choice for residential areas, noise-restricted zones and locations where louder units would detract from the customer experience.

Engineered for extreme conditions

The digital X-Line Series may be compact and remarkably quiet, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t tough. The unit is designed to operate in harsh and extreme conditions — from low ambient conditions to temperatures up to 120 °F — and it’s resistant to corrosion. CoreSense electronic controls constantly tune and adapt the system for optimum performance and efficiencies in any condition.

Refrigeration strategies that work

Rising energy rates and high customer expectations are making energy performance and floor plan adaptability critical to operational success. At Emerson, we are redefining refrigeration technologies and strategies to help small-format operations be more competitive in their markets. From decreased costs to smarter insights to greater peace of mind, the digital X-Line Series provides versatility and a lower total cost of ownership.

Learn more about how the digital X-Line Series is boosting outdoor condensing unit performance by reading the full E360 article.

 

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

RajanRajendran2 Rajan Rajendran | V.P., System Innovation Center and Sustainability

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

As the phasedown of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants continues globally, the United States currently lacks a federal mandate with which to govern their use in both AC and commercial refrigeration. Instead, several state-led initiatives and proposals are driving sustainability measures now in the U.S. At a recent E360 breakfast at the AHR event, I co-hosted an industry discussion with Jennifer Butsch, Emerson’s regulatory affairs manager of air conditioning, on the latest developments in refrigerant regulations and rulemaking.

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

Ever-evolving HFC Phasedown Requires Industry Guidance and Participation

Gauging from the level of interest from those who attended, the U.S. regulatory climate is an important topic for industry stakeholders. With dynamic developments taking place along state and federal lines, it’s more important than ever to stay informed and engage with any efforts to steer these evolving regulations in the direction of regulatory uniformity.

From Kigali to the EPA to the U.S. Climate Alliance

The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol remains the global force behind the phasedown of HFCs. Currently, more than 90 countries — not including the U.S. — have ratified this international treaty and plan to follow its recommendations to reduce the use of HFC refrigerants with high global warming potential (GWP). In the U.S., the rollback of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Significant New Alternative Policy (SNAP) Rules 20 and 21 has deregulated the use of these HFCs from a federal perspective.

Even though SNAP Rules 20 and 21 have been vacated, today they serve as the regulatory framework for a growing number of states in the U.S. Climate Alliance — which currently is comprised of 25 member states representing 55 percent of the national population and $11.7 trillion in economic contributions. Among these, California, Washington, Vermont and New Jersey legally have adopted SNAP Rules 20 and 21, with five additional states proposing similar measures. Their charter is committed to “implementing policies that advance the goals of the Paris Agreement, aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 26-28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.”

While these new states share a common regulatory framework, enforcement dates of refrigerant phasedowns per application vary from state to state. Although the industry recognizes the states’ sovereignty to take environmental action, we also urge consistency in approach and enforcement to reduce complexity. Imagine the challenge for contractors covering a multi-state territory where each state has different enforcement dates. This is the type of complexity that we should strive to avoid as an industry.

All eyes on CARB proposals

Not only was California the first state to adopt SNAP Rules 20 and 21 — which have already taken effect — its California Air Resources Board (CARB) has mandated 40 percent HFC emissions reductions from the state’s 2013 baseline levels by 2030. To date, California has taken the most aggressive environmental stance of any of the U.S. Climate Alliance states, and in many ways, is creating the path forward for other states to follow. This is precisely why it’s so important for industry stakeholders in all states to pay close attention to active proposals and engage in any opportunities to comment on the nature of proposed rulemaking.

Currently, the following CARB proposals for AC and chiller applications are open for additional industry input and comments:

AC

  • 750 GWP limit for new residential and non-residential, air-conditioning equipment, effective Jan. 1, 2023

Chillers and process chillers

  • 750 GWP limit for new chillers designed for a minimum evaporator temperature > -15 °F, effective Jan. 1, 2024
  • 2,200 GWP limit for new process chillers designed for a minimum evaporator temperature between -15 °F and -58 °F, effective Jan. 1, 2024

For the commercial refrigeration sector, CARB’s proposals have evolved to consider the challenges facing operators of existing food retail facilities by introducing the option of meeting a company-wide weighted average GWP or achieving a 55 percent reduction in Greenhouse Gas Potential (GHGp).

New commercial refrigeration

  • 150 GWP limit for new, non-residential refrigeration equipment containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant, effective Jan. 1, 2022

Companies owning or operating 20 or more retail food facilities

  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 2,500 GWP or achieve a 25 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2026
  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 1,400 GWP or achieve a 55 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2030

Companies owning or operating fewer than 20 retail food facilities

  • Attain a company-wide weighted average of 1,400 GWP or achieve a 55 percent reduction in GHGp below 2018 levels, effective Jan. 1, 2030

CARB has asked the industry for input and comments on these proposals, which are expected to be finalized later this year. It’s critically important to review the details, definitions and exceptions to these proposed rules in order to gain a clear understanding of how they might impact you and provide informed feedback to help steer the rulemaking process.

New federal HFC bills on the horizon

With the EPA no longer authorized to regulate HFC use, the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives have each penned new bills that would put the EPA in alignment with the Kigali Amendment and restore the EPA’s authority to phase down the production and consumption of HFCs over a 15-year period.

  • Senate: American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2019 (S2754)
  • House: American Innovation Leadership Act of 2020 (HR5544)

While the future and timing of these new bills are uncertain, they offer the potential to re-establish a federal standard for HFC management, including guidelines for servicing, recovery, recycling and reclamation. In the best-case scenario, these could provide the industry guidance that individual states need to move forward with a unified approach, remove the legislative burden from the states, and reduce regulatory complexity.

Download our full AHR breakfast presentation to learn more about proposed refrigerant rulemaking and how to prepare for regulations in your region.

Refrigerant Regulations Update and Industry Trends

Jennifer_Butsch Jennifer Butsch | Regulatory Affairs Manager

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In the United States, the regulations governing the use of refrigerants in commercial refrigeration and AC applications remain in a state of flux. Our next E360 Webinar will take place on Tuesday, March 31 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT and provide an update on the latest regulatory developments at the state and federal levels.

Refrigerant Regulations Update and Industry TrendsThe unpredictable nature of environmental regulations in the U.S. continues to be a source of great uncertainty in today’s commercial refrigeration and AC industries. While many countries around the world are following international guidelines set forth by the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol and the Paris Agreement, the U.S. has rolled back its former federal refrigerant regulations and has yet to participate in these multi-national climate measures.

However, at the state level domestically, things are evolving quickly. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is moving forward with its stated 2030 deadline of reducing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions by 40 percent from the state’s 2013 baseline levels. While CARB is currently drafting specific proposals on how to achieve this goal, it’s clear that supermarkets and cold storage operators will soon need to accelerate their transition to new refrigerant alternatives that offer much lower global warming potential (GWP).

California is forging a path to long-term environmental sustainability that many other states are following. Currently, 25 states and provinces have joined the U.S. Climate Alliance — which represents 55 percent of the national population — and committed their leadership on climate change initiatives, including the reduction of HFCs. But with 25 governing bodies working toward similar goals, we’re already seeing the possibility of divergent regulatory approaches that would make it increasingly difficult for our industry to manage.

Meanwhile, both the House of Representatives and the Senate have introduced new bills that would give the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to regulate HFCs. With this dynamic mix of activities and new developments happening almost every week, it’s becoming more important than ever to stay informed. Our next E360 Webinar is dedicated to making sense of this turbulent regulatory climate and will provide you with guidance on how to prepare for the future.

This timely and informative E360 Webinar will take place on Tuesday, March 31 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT. It will be hosted by Emerson’s leading experts on refrigerant regulations: Rajan Rajendran, vice president, systems innovation center and sustainability; and Jennifer Butsch, manager, regulatory affairs. Attendees will learn:

  • How CARB is building upon its Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) ruling foundation with newly proposed HFC refrigerant phase-down efforts
  • How some U.S. Climate Alliance states are adopting the EPA’s SNAP Rules 20 and 21 on their own individual timelines
  • Status of the standards governing charge limits and safe use of A2L and A3 refrigerants, including the potential impacts on building codes
  • Availability of new low-GWP refrigerants
  • Update on the new federal HFC regulations introduced by the Senate and the House
  • New and emerging industry trends to watch closely

Register now for this informative and free webinar.

 

Three Ways Restaurant Operators Can Realize the Full Potential of Connected Controls

SteveWeiss_2 Steve Weiss | Vice President, Business Development

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Food safety and quality are critical to foodservice operations, which is why the business case for kitchen connectivity tends to prioritize both. But operators who limit their use case to these factors are overlooking the potential advantages connected controls offer to their bottom line. As I explained in a recent E360 Outlook article, standard (parametric) and embedded (custom) controls with internet of things (IoT) capabilities can also serve as a catalyst for improved operational efficiencies.

Three Ways Restaurant Operators Can Realize the Full Potential of Connected Controls

The integration of standard and embedded controls is common on both the hot and cold sides of kitchen operations in order to regulate temperature and optimize performance. So it’s not a major leap to expand the application of IoT technology to reduce energy, labor and maintenance costs. Here are three ways operators can derive greater cost savings from their connected controls.

1: Reduce energy costs on the cold side

On the cold side, standard controls are typically used in a “set it and forget it” fashion. Yet advances in refrigeration control technology provide for much greater functionalities. Operators can gain real-time insights into system performance and receive alerts when temperature deviations or equipment malfunctions occur. As a result, they can address issues immediately — before they become a drag on system performance, drive up utility bills, and put food quality at risk.

Consider the repercussions of leaving a walk-in door open. This simple act can cause a chain reaction that, at best, reduces the system’s efficiency but at worst, puts the entire inventory at risk. Connected controls can issue an alert when this occurs, allowing an operator to immediately address the oversight.

2: Automate manual processes on the hot side

Embedded controls can also be connected to transform the hot side of a kitchen, such as automating kitchen preparation and implementing important checks on food safety for regulatory compliance. In connected kitchens, these controls can also collect and log Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) data, minimizing manual steps and improving documentation accuracy.

Large foodservice operators can also use their connected controls to digitally push menu changes from corporate headquarters to stores across their networks. By reducing a complex, labor-intensive process to a few simple steps, these stores can cut labor costs while guaranteeing that their menus and recipes are updated quickly and consistently.

3: Build a more effective maintenance program

Connected kitchens can also provide operators with centralized control of their entire store network — from kitchen equipment to HVAC and lighting systems. With the capabilities afforded by IoT, cloud storage and analytics software, operators can monitor system performance from their hand-held devices. And just as important, they can leverage the insights available at their fingertips to create proactive or condition-based maintenance programs. In this scenario, issues can be detected, anticipated and resolved before they disrupt operations or lead to costly truck rolls.

Getting the most out of your controls

Most refrigeration equipment manufactured in the past seven years is connectable. So for operators, the question shouldn’t be “Can we do this?” but rather, “What do we want to accomplish?” By shifting the conversation to desired outcomes, operators will be better able to make the right strategic investments to gain their desired return.

The key for operators is understanding that there is no “one size fits all” solution for attaining a connected kitchen. The IoT infrastructure should be built to deliver on your desired outcomes, rather than forcing your business objectives to conform to the system architecture. At Emerson, we’re helping restaurant operators of all sizes gain the full potential of connected controls so they can better tackle their most pressing market challenges. Learn how you can get connected by contacting an Emerson representative today.

Shedding Light on Food Safety During the Cold Chain Journey

MattToone_2 Matt Toone | Vice President, Sales & Solutions – Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Whether you’re a convenience store (c-store) operator, quick-service restaurant (QSR), or a fast casual or fine dining establishment, ensuring food quality and safety is imperative to your success. In this blog, the second of a three-part series based on a recent E360 article, Minimizing Food Safety Risks From Farm to Fork, I explore the environmental factors and conditions putting food at risk as well as the food safety regulatory landscape.

Shedding Light on Food Safety During the Cold Chain Journey

About one in six Americans contracts a foodborne illness every year. That’s 48 million people, or roughly the population of the New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Dallas metropolitan areas combined.

For a restaurant or c-store, a single outbreak of foodborne illness can result in thousands (or even millions) of dollars in fines. Add to that the potential for damage to your brand, and it can easily take years to recover from an incident.

The challenge for foodservice operators is that they are stationed at the end of a very long cold chain. That’s why it’s essential for them to understand how and where food safety and quality are most at risk. Armed with this knowledge, they will be better positioned to ensure that food is safe upon receipt.

Multiple factors put food safety at risk

From production and processing to transportation and cold storage, it can take days or even weeks for food to journey from farms to kitchens. At every point in that process, food safety can be compromised.

Harvesting practices can accelerate food spoilage. Improper processing and unsafe handling can introduce bacterial pathogens, such as E. coli and listeria, into the cold chain. Cross-contamination during shipping, storage and handling can amplify the risk of foodborne illness.

Unsurprisingly, temperature also plays a major — and sometimes overlooked — role in food safety. Optimal temperature ranges for produce, meats, dairy and frozen foods must be strictly maintained throughout the cold chain to preserve food quality. Deviations at any point can be an invitation for bacterial growth, not to mention a shorter shelf life.

Of course, operators have no control over how food is handled or stored prior to receipt. But that doesn’t make them any less susceptible to bad headlines should an outbreak occur under their watch. What they can and should do is meticulously review data logs prior to receipt to ensure the shipments were maintained at optimal conditions. And until the food is sold to a customer, operators must continue to ensure they are following safe food storage and handling practices in their own kitchens.

Managing regulatory expectations

With so much at stake, it’s easy to see why foodservice is such a tightly regulated industry. For restaurants and c-stores, though, this means an ever-higher bar on food safety and quality standards. As a result, operators must understand and navigate a new landscape of transparency and traceability. This is especially true as the regulatory focus increasingly shifts from reactive measures to proactive prevention. Going forward, operators at all links in the cold chain can expect greater requirements for monitoring and documenting food safety.

But there’s good news for foodservice operators: technology is on their side. Advances in refrigeration science, increased automation and the rise of internet of things (IoT) technologies are making it easier than ever to manage, maintain and monitor consistent temperature controls within the cold chain. Moreover, with more data available, operators have greater visibility into the conditions their food was subjected to on its long journey. As a result, they will be less “in the dark” about the products they stake their brands on.

We’ll explore this further in my next blog, which will focus on the cold chain journey and the technologies that are putting improved food safety within reach.

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