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Posts from the ‘Internet of Things’ Category

The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens

Paul_Hepperla Paul Hepperla | Vice President, Solutions Integration – Foodservice

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

 

Join us our next E360 Webinar, “The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens” on Tuesday, December 11 at 2 p.m. EST / 11 a.m. PST.

The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens

It seems everywhere you turn and across multiple industries, companies are touting the promise that the internet of Things (IoT) will digitally transform their operations. The restaurant sector is no exception. In recent years, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and restaurant retailers have spent considerable time and effort figuring out how to leverage the power of connectivity in commercial kitchens.

While it’s relatively easy to conceptualize how the internet of things (IoT) could improve operational efficiencies and provide business value, bringing these ideas to fruition has proved more difficult. Too often, we see retailers make the jump to connecting assets without first having a clear idea of what problem they’re trying to solve, or how connectivity will fundamentally change the way their business operates. Then, once everything is connected, they’re left wondering: “What’s next?”

Our next E360 Webinar will examine why this is the case, and focus on how foodservice OEMs and retailers can work together to tap the seemingly limitless potential of IoT. My presentation, “The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens” will focus on these key points:

  • The importance of defining the scope and purpose of your connected project
  • An examination of the far-reaching and dramatic impacts to your business
  • Real-world examples of successful and failed connectivity projects
  • Evaluating business models that involve service contracts, recurring revenue or monetization

Another common problem with connected kitchen projects is underestimating the complexities inherent with these new business models. For example, a connected maintenance offering might require somewhat sophisticated coordination of not only OEM and end user roles, but also the inclusion of an authorized service provider. Frankly, these are the types of business relationships and interactions that are often overlooked when companies rush to exploit the power of IoT before thinking through the implications.

The webinar will look at these challenges from both OEM and retail perspectives. For an OEM, it’s critically important to understand their customers’ business needs before launching a connected initiative. Similarly, retailers need to realize that without involving and engaging their OEM partners in their connected kitchen strategy, they’re not likely to achieve the maximum potential of their IoT solution.

So, if you’re thinking about entering into a connected kitchen project or IoT business model in the restaurant sector, register now to gain a better understanding of the risks and rewards of connectivity.

Connectivity Is on the Menu

Today, many c-stores offer an ever-changing menu of fresh food offerings. The variety of these healthy choices makes hungry customers happier, but creates complications for the c-store chain.Read the full article here.

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The Internet of Refrigeration

Dean Landeche_Blog Dean Landeche | V.P. of Marketing , Retail Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I contributed to an article published in Condenser magazine. The focus of the piece was to analyze how networked equipment is aiming to improve safety and operations.

 The Internet of Things – an increasingly massive network of electronically connected systems, devices and people that enables cross-platform data sharing – is creating a large, connected ecosystem across many industries, including refrigeration.

woman choosing ice cream at grocery store freezer

There is continuing growth in remote monitoring with all types of refrigeration equipment, driven largely by the need to safeguard consumers and food, manage energy use, and provide a consistent, effective maintenance program.

Retail groceries have long recognized the importance of connected refrigeration systems, and have high adoption rates of connected devices. Previously, the primary focus was operating alerts and alarms to indicate problems. Now with more points of connection, more sophisticated data from embedded sensor and controllers and advanced analytics capabilities in the ‘big data’ world, the focus has changed to creating more insights that drive specific decisions and actions.

There is much more interest and use of information to prompt action in advance, based on opportunities and trends identified in data patterns rather than reacting to failure modes and alerts. Applied at the system, site and enterprise levels, those types of insight-driven actions have huge implications for cost-saving, labor productivity, maintenance improvement, food safety and more.

Through remote monitoring, equipment owners and their service providers can often detect problems, as they emerge rather than after-the-fact in an emergency breakdown. Major food safety risk and food loss is often avoided, and system operation can be maintained through proactive efforts. The adoption of remote monitoring for refrigerant leak detection is also becoming more common. Advanced data can often identify small leaks up to 30 days prior to discovery by leak detectors.

Today’s smarter systems are making it easier, faster, and highly reliable to implement equipment monitoring and performance processes.

Read the full article here.

 

How BMS, EMS, IoT and Insight are Changing Retail Operations [Video]

ronchapek_2 Ron Chapek | Senior Product Manager, Retail Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

The prevalence of BMS, EMS, Internet of Things (IoT) and insight have ushered in a new era of efficiency in retailer operations. In an E360 Conference presentation, I discussed how the insights that these tools provide allow retailers to do their jobs better, thereby helping to save both time and money.

A brief recap and video of the session are included below.

 

Facilities managers need to be able to effectively convert rapidly expanding and disparate data sources into visually insightful and actionable interfaces that are relevant to a diverse range of users across multiple departments.

In the past, the data wasn’t delivered as quickly and was often historic. A good example is a utility bill that shows past usage, making it difficult to interpret and utilize that data effectively. In contrast, intelligent applications – energy management systems, building management systems and IoT-enabled devices – provide a wide variety of data that is more easily applied. Rather than making decisions on historical data, retailers can use this data for valuable, actionable insights to improver their operations enterprise-wide.

But, the problem is often that when there is so much data available, making it all work for you, in your particular role, can be daunting.

Through Emerson’s Site Manager Software and ProActTM Services retailers can better manage growing data volumes and convert this data into something of value to your business including:

  • Transparent access to data: with context. Retailers have access to a large number of standard reports, available on-demand or on a scheduled basis via email. For example, with a monthly Alarm summary, you can quickly see which locations have the most alarms and focus attention on these stores.
  • Attribute-based visualization. Data can be displayed by region, store type, and other relevant location-based attributes, allowing retailers to do their job faster and correctly the first time around. For example, a service truck can be sent to the right location with exactly the equipment that is needed to make any repairs.
  • Embedded energy and refrigeration domain expertise (IP). Many companies have the ability to manage, move and display data, but what retailers need is a trusted partner that knows and understands their business on a deep level, and understands how to best solve any problems that arise.

The pressure on facilities managers to organize and make sense of all of the facility data that is available is enormous. Think of the kinds of data you need to do your job well. We can help you design the right type of analytics to automate that data and make your job easier.

For the full presentation, visit this link.

For more than 20 years, Emerson Retail Solutions has been helping businesses like yours safeguard food, reduce energy consumption, protect the environment and optimize business results. To learn more about our technology solutions and services for retailers, visit our website.

Using Facility Data to Provide Value to Retail Customers

I recently wrote an article featured in HVACR Business on how connecting equipment to a building management system gives retailers a competitive edge. Below are the highlights:

Food retail facilities generate a significant amount of data, with information on key building systems, including HVAC and refrigeration equipment, which can provide an extensive picture of their operations. But, each of these facility systems has its own reporting practices so aggregating and mining the data can be difficult.

hvacr_biz_iot

The Internet of Things (IoT) is enabling better information management and improved diagnostics and control of HVACR systems for retailers.

HVACR contractors can use connected technology to their advantage to provide better service. A simple, centralized control platform allows users at all organizational levels to track facility data across multiple sites, providing real-time views into refrigeration, HVAC and lighting systems enterprise-wide.

Regardless of size, food retail stores will continue to be populated with legacy equipment and new generations of devices functioning on different operating systems. By connecting the equipment through IoT, HVACR contractors can remotely upgrade these systems with software, reducing time for taking equipment down or swapping out pieces. Technicians will not have to be onsite to make adjustments, resulting in an improved user experience.

Contractors can also leverage remote monitoring services to assist in troubleshooting and management of equipment for retail customers. Monitoring centers – like the ProAct Service Center – can remotely process, triage and resolve alarms around-the-clock. Their experts can assess equipment performance to provide timely information on energy expenditure, maintenance costs, refrigerant leaks and shrink causes.

Working with food retailers to adopt a solid IoT plan allows real-time troubleshooting and diagnosis of HVACR system issues. Once the connected equipment is installed, retailers will be able to cost-effectively monitor, diagnose and remedy issues quickly while also maintaining uptime, which is critical to meeting customer expectations and building a positive brand reputation.

 You can read the full HVACR Business article here.

 For more than 20 years, Emerson Retail Solutions has been helping businesses like yours safeguard food, reduce energy consumption, protect the environment and optimize business results. To learn more about our technology solutions and services for retailers, visit our website.

Paul Hepperla
Vice President, North American Solution Sales
Retail Solutions
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

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