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Posts from the ‘Refrigeration’ Category

Refrigeration Decisions Driven by Diverse Priorities

DonNewlon_V2 Don Newlon | V.P./G.M., Refrigeration Marketing
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes an article from our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled Diverse Priorities Continue to Influence Refrigeration Landscape.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

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Today, there are as many factors influencing commercial refrigeration decisions as there are system architectures. As the industry continues to be shaped by regulations, emerging technologies and changing technician demographics, it has become more apparent that there is tremendous diversity among end user priorities.

From first costs, refrigerant considerations and sustainability goals to environmental regulations, energy-efficiency targets and maintenance requirements, end users have more drivers influencing equipment selection criteria than ever before. Since each end user values these factors according to their individual priorities, the hierarchy of priorities differs widely from one customer to the next.

Take Whole Foods Market, for example, a food retailer known for pioneering the use of all-natural refrigeration systems. By using CO2 and R-290 instead of synthetic hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in their Santa Clara, Calif., location, the grocer is seeking to leave the smallest possible carbon footprint while meeting its energy-efficiency targets. All other criteria are secondary.

But for operators in other parts of the country, where energy costs are lower and environmental mandates are less demanding, a more traditional HFC system with lower first costs and more familiar maintenance protocols may be preferred. The same may be said for those who are intimidated by the increased complexities or relative “unknowns” of new system architectures.

If there’s anything we can be certain of, it’s that the refrigeration landscape will continue to change. You may have read about a recent decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, ruling that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had exceeded the authority of its Clean Air Act in its efforts to limit the use of HFCs in commercial refrigeration. While some may support the court’s ruling, others who believe the process of phasing down HFCs is already well underway are calling for an appeal. As of now, we’ll have to wait and see what the true implications of this ruling will be.

Already in Europe, where F-gas regulations limit the use of high global warming potential refrigerants, the price of HFCs is on the rise as supplies dwindle. This is also indicative of how regional idiosyncrasies throughout the world also factor into refrigeration decisions, as the potential of carbon taxes, refrigerant price hikes and local climates must also be considered.

To be sure, there currently is no one-size-fits-all approach to commercial refrigeration. Our goal is not to favor one architecture over another, but to help end users balance this difficult equation for themselves — and based on their unique priorities, take the best approach.

Seven Keys to Servicing CO2 Systems

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, CO2 Business Development

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes an article from our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled Keys to Servicing CO2 Systems.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

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From a service technician’s perspective, CO2 has unique performance characteristics and operating peculiarities that dictate system design and impact maintenance requirements. Following are seven key considerations to be aware of when servicing CO2 systems.

  1. Low critical point (subcritical vs. transcritical) — R-744 has a relatively low critical point (1,055 psig or 87.8 °F) that determines its modes of operation. Subcritical mode refers to systems operating in regions with colder climates and lower ambient temperatures where the refrigeration cycle takes place below 87.8 °F. Transcritical mode takes place above this point (also referred to as supercritical) such as in warmer regions or periods during the summer heat.
  2. Higher operating pressure — one of the common reservations when using CO2 is its relatively high operating pressure. But, it’s important to realize that high pressure only takes place in the beginning stages of the refrigeration cycle while the rest of the refrigeration cycle operates at pressures like that of a traditional R-410A high-side system. Stainless steel piping is typically used to handle these pressures, although high-pressure ferrous alloy copper piping has recently been introduced.
  3. High triple point (possibility of dry ice formation) — triple point is the point at which the three phases of CO2 coexist (60.4 psig or -69.8 °F). While the temperature seems low, the pressure is relatively high by refrigerant standards. As the pressure approaches that point in CO2 systems, the refrigerant will turn to dry ice (an unusable state that’s neither a vapor nor a liquid). This can occur during maintenance when a contractor mistakenly thinks the lines are clear, taps the system and discovers the formation of dry ice.
  4. System charging — the high triple point affects R-744’s charging procedures. After pulling a vacuum, the internal pressures of the system will be well below 60.4 psig. Since standard atmospheric pressure is 14.696 psig, the process cannot start with liquid charging. Instead, contractors must vapor-charge the system (roughly to around 145 psig), and then wait until the system has equalized with 145 psig of vapor before charging with liquid.
  5. Managing scheduled shutdowns and power outages — when a CO2 system shuts down for longer periods of time, pressures will build more quickly than in an HFC system. To preserve the system charge, the most reliable method is to install a generator with a standby condensing unit. When the power goes out, the generator powers a condensing unit that has a loop within the flash tank (i.e., receiver) designed to cool the volume of liquid within the tank and keep pressures down.
  6. Resumption of power — the electronic expansion valve (EEV) on every CO2 case utilizes a stepper motor or a pulse-width modulated type of valve. When the power goes out, the stepper motor is frozen in that exact position, leaving the system’s CO2 evaporators susceptible to flooding. R-744 naturally migrates quickly to these cold evaporators, and when the system resumes, this can cause considerable damage to compressors. To avoid this, liquid line solenoids placed upstream of the EEV, supercapacitors or battery backups are often used on case controls to force the valves closed during a power outage.
  7. Form a refrigerant plan — managing CO2 is different from what contractors may be accustomed to with traditional HFCs. Operators and contractors alike need to understand the local codes for storing R-744 cylinders (inside or outside the building), and develop an appropriate strategy.

[New E360 Webinar] Using Technology to Help Meet Modern Refrigeration Challenges

benpicker Ben Picker | Copeland Units Project Manager

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Join us for our next E360 Webinar, “Using Technology to Help Meet Modern Refrigeration Challenges” on Thursday, December 7 at 2 p.m. EST / 11 a.m. PST.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you’re a supermarket, restaurant, mixed retailer or convenience store operator, successfully navigating today’s commercial refrigeration landscape is no small feat. From regulatory complexities, new refrigerant considerations and energy-efficiency targets to food safety requirements and servicing frustrations, today’s operators face a perfect storm of refrigeration challenges.

The silver lining in this scenario is that these complexities have ushered in a new era of refrigeration technologies. In the past several years, equipment and component manufacturers have made great strides in developing modern equipment and system technologies that address many of these concerns.

In our next E360 Webinar, I will take a closer look at a wide range of technologies and explain how they can be used to solve today’s countless operator challenges. Examples include:

  • Electronic controls for temperature tracking and smart defrosting
  • On-board compressor diagnostics for improved servicing
  • Energy-efficient scroll compression technology
  • Multi-refrigerant compressor capabilities

As we’ve discussed previously in our E360 webinars, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to refrigeration system design. But, as the industry continues its transition to the next generation of refrigeration architectures, many of these technologies will become integral to these systems.

So, if you’re interested in learning how you can leverage these technologies to reduce operational complexities and address your specific challenges, please join me on Thursday, December 7 at 2 p.m. EST / 11 a.m. PST.

[New E360 Webinar] Time to Retrofit Racks? Go Digital!

anijayanth Ani Jayanth | Director, Product Marketing

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Join us for our next E360 Webinar, “Utilizing Digital Retrofits to Achieve Capacity Modulation” on Tuesday, September 26 at 2 p.m. EDT / 11 a.m. PDT.

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Many supermarket retailers today are faced with the prospect of retrofitting their existing refrigeration systems to utilize lower global warming potential refrigerants. While complying with regulations and deploying environmentally friendly systems may be the primary reasons for the retrofit, retailers are also seizing the opportunity to upgrade their systems to provide improved energy efficiencies, tighter setpoints and greater reliability. The integration of a digital compressor in an existing rack — known as a digital retrofit — is becoming an increasingly effective way of achieving these objectives.

Our next E360 Webinar, entitled Utilizing Digital Retrofits to Achieve Capacity Modulation, will explore the potential of digital retrofits. Hosted by Emerson’s Chris Raffel, lead application engineer, the webinar will take a closer look at the digital compression technology behind the architecture and explain how it provides the capacity modulation to greatly improve system efficiencies.

This informative webinar will take place on Tuesday, September 26 at 2 p.m. EDT / 11 a.m. PDT. Attendees will learn about the many operational benefits of digital retrofits, including:

  • Reduced compressor cycling for increased system reliability
  • True load matching capabilities
  • Tighter setpoints for precise case temperatures
  • Significantly higher energy efficiencies than other capacity modulation methods

Chris will also present actual case studies of supermarkets whose digital retrofits achieved measurable energy efficiencies, tighter suction pressures and less food spoilage.

To learn how digital retrofits can provide these benefits in your supermarket, register now for this timely E360 Webinar on Tuesday, September 26 at 2 p.m. EDT / 11 a.m. PDT.

R-290 Condensing Units Deliver Refrigeration Efficiencies and Regulatory Compliance

anijayanth Ani Jayanth | Director, Product Marketing

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes the Product Spotlight column in our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled R-290 Ready.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

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The growing demand for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial refrigeration equipment has led to the resurgence of the natural refrigerant propane (R-290). With a global warming potential of 3, R-290 checks two key regulatory boxes: 1) it is listed as an acceptable refrigerant substitute by the EPA; and 2) it meets the DOE’s call for more energy efficiency in compressors and condensers. To support our OEM customers who are responding to this market demand, Emerson offers a line of condensing units designed to maximize R-290 efficiencies.

As a class A3 (flammable) refrigerant, R-290’s charge limit of 150g has largely constrained its use to smaller, self-contained applications. This makes R-290 an ideal candidate for use in stand-alone, reach-in applications, where the DOE has mandated 30–50 percent reductions in energy consumption as of March 27. This same class of equipment will also be subject to the EPA’s phase-down of commonly used hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants in 2019. The disparate timing of these regulations is forcing foodservice OEMs to consider meeting both requirements in the same design cycle. Currently, R-290 is a leading option for accomplishing both objectives.

Energy-efficient condensing units

Copeland™ M-Line condensing units provide all the technological improvements needed to help OEMs achieve regulatory compliance while giving end users optimal performance in low- and medium-temperature applications. Designed to deliver energy improvements up to 30 percent, M-Line condensing units are built on the following improvements:

  • Latest generation of Copeland hermetic compressors
  • Electronically commutated fan motors (an optional feature)
  • Condenser coil tubing design that enables additional coil rows

Next generation compression technology

Emerson has been testing alternative refrigerants for years to help OEMs make the transition to DOE- and EPA-compliant compression technology. Emerson offers A*E and R*T compressors rated for use with R-290 and available in fractional horsepower options to serve as the basis of Copeland M-Line condensing units. Designed with OEM and end user concerns in mind, these compressors deliver the following benefits:

  • Minimal sound output for quiet operation
  • More than 20 percent energy-efficiency improvements compared to R-404A
  • Little to no environmental impacts

Wider adoption of R-290 is evidence that the commercial refrigeration industry is becoming more comfortable with the natural refrigerant alternative. While OEMs and operators alike have accepted its 150g charge limit, even incremental charge increases would enable significant advances in system design and efficiencies. This charge limit is currently under review by building codes and standards makers. If (and when) charge limits are increased, Emerson will be prepared to make the necessary updates to our compression technology.

This blog summarizes the Product Spotlight column in our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled R-290 Ready.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

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