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Posts from the ‘Retail Solutions’ Category

Six Steps to a Successful Refrigeration Retrofit

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes an article from ACHR NEWS, entitled “Refrigeration Retrofits Offer ‘Cool’ Savings for Supermarkets.” Click here to read the article in its entirety.

The commercial refrigeration system is the biggest energy user in supermarkets, accounting for about 40 to 60 percent of electricity consumption, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For food retailers, getting energy consumption under control is a top priority, and the refrigeration industry has stepped in with new, higher-efficiency equipment and technologies, such as advanced monitoring and control via the internet of things (IoT). However, for many retailers, virtually all their equipment is aging, and buying new equipment and systems across the board would be prohibitively expensive. But there is another path to saving a considerable amount of energy: targeted retrofits or upgrades to their existing systems.

Some energy-saving modifications can be simple and obvious, such as adding doors to cases. But at a recent Emerson E360 Forum, I explained how a systematic approach to retrofits and upgrades can identify savings throughout a store’s entire refrigeration infrastructure, particularly older, energy-demanding direct expansion (DX) centralized systems. It is a six-step process that reveals the primary causes of energy loss and, step by step, proposes energy-saving retrofits and upgrades to your system that can systematically reduce energy costs without breaking the bank.

  1. Conduct a baseline energy audit throughout the store by installing energy-monitoring equipment. These sensors help you analyze the existing energy signature of the entire store before you make any adjustments or retrofits, and will also be invaluable for future temperature monitoring and control to ensure food safety and quality.
  2. Recommission your existing equipment to factory specifications. This may include adjusting setpoints, superheat, suction pressure and other settings. In the process, any broken components can be repaired. This one step alone can result in energy savings of 18 percent or more.
  3. Upgrade your refrigeration technologies. One effective upgrade is changing discus compressors to digital compressors. This single retrofit can reduce compressor cycling, increase system reliability, and improve energy efficiency by 16 percent or more. Installing variable-frequency drives on condenser fan motors can save even more.
  4. Upgrade your HVAC system. Ambient store temperatures are major stressors on refrigeration systems. Consider upgrading rooftop units and adding demand-controlled ventilation and humidity controls. Integrating the rooftop units with the refrigeration system in the store is another option, creating a self-contained ecosystem that balances ambient and refrigeration temperatures for significant energy savings.
  5. Upgrade lighting and other renewables. Adding modern lighting technology lowers temperatures. Installing doors onto units lowers energy losses. Electronic case controls and expansion valves (EEVs) fine-tune equipment temperatures, while upgrading to electronically commutated (EC) motors lowers electricity consumption while improving equipment efficiency.
  6. Perform condition-based maintenance. Once you’ve migrated to these capital upgrades, it’s important to step up your regular maintenance intervals to continue your gains in efficiency and cost savings.

With these targeted retrofits and upgrades, you can systematically make your centralized DX system more effective in maintaining food quality and safety while simultaneously uncovering efficiencies that can result in significant savings.

Supermarket Upgrades That Impact Energy Efficiency and Cost Savings

DarrenCooper Darren Cooper | President

Renteknik Group

At the E360 Forum in Houston last fall, Nik Rasskazovskiy, director of business development for ClearFlow Energy Finance, and I discussed the role of energy services companies (ESCOs) in helping grocery operators achieve and sustain long-term energy savings with end-to-end solutions. We shared our insights and experiences, as well as best practices and real-world case studies. Read more below, then view the full E360 Forum presentation.

According to Progressive Grocer Magazine, food retail is an almost $700 billion industry. Operating on razor-thin margins (generally a little more than 1 percent and only seeming to get slimmer every year), the industry is always on the lookout for new ways to cut costs and boost profitability.

Already making a considerable positive impact on the bottom line in other industries, ESCOs can offer grocery operators a new opportunity to reduce their energy spend — and increase profits.

Reducing energy spend is already a key objective for supermarket operators. ESCOs offer a systematic way to implement sustainable, long-term efficiency plans across their fleet with minimal risk or initial out-of-pocket expense.

How does it work?

ESCOs are in the business of developing, designing, funding and ultimately building turnkey solutions that save energy, reduce energy costs, and decrease operations and maintenance costs at their customers’ facilities.

ESCOs actually guarantee their clients a specific level of energy cost savings from the proposed project. They are subsequently compensated via the actual performance of the project, earning a percentage of the overall energy savings dollars for an agreed upon length of time. At the end of the term, the client keeps the savings for perpetuity.

In the presentation, I said, “The opportunities are real and the savings are real. We’re not doing anything that is really groundbreaking. This is not new technology. This is proven technology that you can actually utilize and implement in your systems. The ESCO part means that there’s no upfront cash necessary. We’re now in a position to provide this as a turnkey solution. We can work with your preferred equipment supplier and your preferred contractor, without needing any money, so you’re cash flow positive from day one.” And I meant every word of it.

The first step in your journey to energy efficiency: establishing a baseline

To identify savings opportunities, you must first fully understand your current energy consumption. Fortunately, today’s device-level power monitoring technologies offer real-time insights into your control systems and can help create “power profiles” by tracking usage across a wide range of temperatures and conditions.

Beginning from that baseline, the ESCO team works with food retailers to conduct comprehensive building and systems audits to identify opportunities for sustainable, long-term energy efficiency upgrades. This can take the form of refrigeration upgrades, variable frequency drives (VFDs), new cases or case controls, HVAC and demand control ventilation, and even renewable technologies if they make sense.

A proven process that’s yielded positive results, the ESCO methodology is sound and straightforward:

  • Building system audit completed — opportunities identified, target savings established
  • Client and ESCO enter into guaranteed, performance-based energy savings performance contract
  • ESCO secures financing
  • Project is built and commissioned
  • Ongoing monitoring and verification ensure that target efficiency savings are being met
  • Lender is repaid from savings
  • At the end of the term, the client keeps all savings

“It’s really a win-win situation,” noted Rasskazovskiy, who’s successfully navigated the financial end of projects across multiple industries. “Once the ESCO organizes everything, implements the project and the savings start trickling in, there’s a management process that verifies that the actual savings have been achieved. Those savings are shared between the end customer and the ESCO to pay out all the services costs, including financing. After the term of the contract is done, the customer is left with the same equipment and gets to enjoy 100 percent of the savings going forward.”

To learn more about ESCOs and the retail food industry, including real-world savings examples, watch the video here.

 

Refrigerant Management: How Changes to Section 608 Impact Our Industry

JohnWallace_Blog_Image John Wallace | Director of Innovation, Retail Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I was recently interviewed for an article in ACHR’s The News magazine, “EPA’s Proposed Changes to Section 608 Cause Concern in the Industry,” where I provided my perspective on the current state of leak detection, repair and other provisions.

Refrigerant leak response and repair regulations have placed our industry in uncertain waters. As you may know, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a new rule that rescinds some provisions of its Section 608 mandate, affecting equipment with 50 lbs. or more of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) or other substitute refrigerants. These best practices were developed in consultation with the HVACR industry to ensure safety, establish proper reclaim and recycling processes, and of course, reduce carbon emissions.

In November 2016, the EPA extended the scope of Section 608 — from refrigerants containing ozone-depleting substances (ODS) to nonexempt substitute refrigerants such as HFCs. Because the Court of Appeals ruled in 2017 that the EPA could not ban HFCs, the agency has decided that it also did not have the authority to regulate these refrigerants under Section 608.

Establishing best practices

Awareness of the importance of leak detection has grown exponentially in recent years. Today, most companies understand that implementing a leak response and repair program is simply a best practice. And for those companies that have already taken steps to comply with Section 608, the vacating of this rule will have little impact.

I stated in the article: “These procedures not only benefit the environment but also help ensure HVACR equipment operates at peak efficiency, including at the lowest overall cost. One of the benefits of the existing regulations has been to raise the awareness of best practices related to HVACR maintenance. Increased awareness generally leads to broader adoption by those in the industry, regardless of whether regulations are in place.”

Simply put, leak detection and repair programs make good sense, regardless of the regulations in place or the type of refrigerant being used. However, with the reversal of Section 608, equipment operators will no longer be under federal mandate to follow these widely adopted refrigerant management best practices:

  • Conducting leak rate calculations when refrigerant is added to an appliance
  • Repairing an appliance that leaks above a threshold leak rate
  • Conducting verification tests on repairs
  • Conducting periodic leak inspections on appliances that exceed the threshold leak rate
  • Reporting to the EPA about chronically leaking appliances
  • Retrofitting or retiring appliances that are not repaired
  • Maintaining related records
  • Overseeing technicians’ use of certified equipment and the reclamation process

These procedures are already considered to be the optimal standard practice, and end users who are focused on operational excellence are likely doing many (or most) of them today.

Maintaining other key program elements

The absence of a federal mandate for responsible HFC management creates a quandary for our industry. Currently, the EPA is seeking comments about the remaining provisions of Section 608, raising concerns about the potential for overturning other benefits of programs — specifically, guidelines for refrigerant reclaim procedures and technician certification and training programs.

Proper refrigerant reclamation reduces the likelihood of introducing impurities, which could lead to premature failures and increased maintenance costs for owners of HVACR equipment. What’s more, the certification program provides the vital information on how to deal with the ever-growing number of refrigerants. As I stated in the article: “One benefit of certification is that wholesalers are able to sell refrigerants to technicians who have a sufficient background and understanding of their liability under the Clean Air Act.”

Path forward

Already, several states are adopting standards for leak detection and control. Again, as I noted in the article, “We are already seeing some states such as California enact regulations that adopt many of the requirements in Section 608. Other states will likely step in, which may create more headaches for the industry. This could create problems for the industry and lead to a patchwork of inconsistent regulations that would be challenging for manufacturers and service providers to navigate.”

As always, Emerson will help you stay informed about further changes to Section 608. Regardless of the regulatory decisions, we’ll continue to provide guidance and expertise on how to design and implement refrigerant management programs.

Top Five Reasons to Choose Copeland Scroll™

Phil Moeller | Vice President – Product Management, Refrigeration
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In an industry era defined by dynamic market forces and regulatory uncertainty, choosing a compression platform as the foundation for your refrigeration equipment is more critical than ever. As supermarket, restaurant and convenience store retailers face unprecedented changes in the way they conduct business, their refrigeration requirements are quickly evolving. Modern systems must meet a variety of emerging challenges, such as:

  • Supporting small- to large-store formats
  • Complying with food safety and environmental regulations
  • Adapting to e-commerce and omnichannel fulfillment requirements
  • Integrating with IoT technologies and building management systems
  • Achieving energy-efficiency and sustainability goals

Whether you’re an OEM updating your product lines, an end user evaluating compressors for new applications, or a technician performing system upgrades and retrofits, the Copeland Scroll compressor platform has the breadth of product lines to meet today’s demanding requirements.

Copeland Scroll has consistently pushed the envelope in refrigeration reliability for decades, and these innovations continue today. Here are the top five reasons leading equipment manufacturers, end users and contractors choose Copeland Scroll to support their refrigeration initiatives:

  1. Widest application and capacity range — When it comes to low- and medium-temperature applications in fractional to large-horsepower capacities from ¾ to 17 HP, only Copeland Scroll meets the full breadth of specifications for today’s diverse applications. In 2019, we’ll add three additional capacities to our popular KA lineup, which recently took home an Innovation Award at the 2018 AHR Expo.

 

  1. Technology leader — Since its introduction, Copeland Scroll has set the standard in compression technology. From digital modulation, liquid- and vapor-injection and low condensing operation to onboard electronic diagnostics and compatibility with low-GWP alternative and natural refrigerants, the Copeland Scroll platform continues to lead the industry in performance- enhancing innovations.

 

  1. Superior reliability and energy-efficiency At the end of the day, what matters most to our customers are reliable performance and energy-efficiency. With 70 percent fewer moving parts and a simple internal suction and discharge method, Copeland Scroll delivers reliable, energy- efficient performance, year after year. Its compact and lightweight design allows it to be integrated in applications where space is limited, without ever sacrificing performance or efficiency.

 

  1. Expert distribution network and support — As the standard in scroll compression technology, Copeland Scroll is backed by a wholesaler network comprised of 850 Copeland-authorized locations with more than 340 certified Copeland technical specialists on staff. And since Copeland Scroll is manufactured in the U.S., when you need customer service, product support or availability, representatives from our American base of operations can quickly deliver the compressor you need.

 

  1. Product development expertise — When you choose Copeland Scroll compressors, you’re also partnering with Emerson and gaining access to our extensive capabilities to support your product development efforts, including: application engineering; design, testing and certification services; innovation center proof-of-concepts; and app development.

 

From transport to cold storage, Copeland Scroll compressors are the first choice in every link of the food supply chain. So, don’t put your company’s reputation at risk. Choose the leader in scroll compression and commercial refrigeration technologies. Choose the proven dependability of Copeland Scroll.

 

An Ounce of Prevention Could Help Save Lives, Reputations and Revenues

Dean Landeche_Blog Dean Landeche | Marketing Cold Chain Leader
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog is a commentary on an April 2018 article published on Science Daily’s website at which evaluated a recent study on the costs of food borne illnesses in restaurants.

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It seems like every month there’s a new story of a high-profile food recall or restaurant shutdown due to food borne illness outbreaks. As if food retailers need to be reminded of the damage these incidents can inflict on a brand, too often we hear of major chains and manufacturers having to close their doors — in part due to food poisoning judgments. Even if these companies do manage to stay in business, the potential for financial, reputation and human costs is significant.

And if those weren’t enough incentives, restaurants also have regulatory drivers for food safety. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), for example, seeks to push for improved traceability throughout the food supply chain.

Foodborne illness outbreaks can certainly be major setbacks for restaurants, but to date, the impacts of these incidents on bottom lines have been difficult to quantify. Many restaurant retailers are not fully aware of the potential financial costs of these incidents. Knowing this information can help them determine how much to invest in appropriate food-safety measures.

Study shows costs are proportionate to the size of the outbreak

A recent study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that just one outbreak can cost millions in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases and more.

Based on computer simulations used in the study, a foodborne illness outbreak can have a large impact, regardless of the size of the restaurant or the outbreak. A fast food restaurant could incur anywhere from $4,000 for a single outbreak in which five people get sick to $2.5 million for a single outbreak in which 250 people fall ill (taking into account lost revenue, lawsuits, legal fees and fines).

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the annual occurrences of foodborne illness are more common than we may think:

  • Approximately 48 million people get sick
  • 28,000 are hospitalized
  • 3,000 die from food-related illnesses, which are often referred to as food poisoning

Pathogens that caused outbreaks in restaurants from 2010–2015 include listeria, norovirus, hepatitis A, E. coli and salmonella.

Preventative actions are the cure

The question then becomes: What’s causing these pathogens to arise? Often, the leading causes can simply be traced to not adhering to basic food safety best practices: cross-contamination; time and temperature excursions; cleaning; and sanitation.

Of course, Emerson can play an integral role in helping retailers minimize temperature deviations and maintain optimal conditions throughout the supply chain. We know that out-of-tolerance temperatures over prolonged periods of time can contribute to many of the threats posed to food quality. Our capabilities in temperature management, tracking and recording at all stages of food’s journey have become increasingly important for cold chain operators.

Our GO Real-Time temperature trackers for the cargo space provide live monitoring and reporting of perishable product cargo container temperature and location from anywhere in the world. The solution captures and stores data in a cloud-based monitoring portal, then sends alerts and status reports via email or text message to help stakeholders ensure product freshness and safety at every step.

Designed for restaurants and supermarkets, our Cooper-Atkins products and solutions offer temperature management and monitoring products for both spot inspections and fixed locations where food is handled, prepared and stored. These powerful products give people the ability to access food conditions and predict, preempt and control any issues related to quality or safety. These real-time temperature trackers can be accessed anytime, anywhere with a network connection, helping retailers ensure only the freshest and safest products reach customers.

Potential loss outweighs the cost

The Johns Hopkins study reinforces what we already knew: that there is a significant potential for health, human and revenue losses from outbreaks of foodborne illnesses. With today’s advances in digital, connected technologies, operators all across the cold chain have the tools at their disposal to prevent these incidents.

As one of the experts cited in the report, “Paying for and implementing proper infection control measures should be viewed as an investment to avoid these costs, which can top a million dollars.”

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