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Posts tagged ‘Allen Wicher’

Manufacturer Takes “Combined Design Cycle” Approach to Regulatory Compliance

AllenWicher Allen Wicher | Director, Foodservice Marketing

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes a success story in our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled Going With the Grain.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

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The Department of Energy’s (DOE) 2014 ruling mandated 30–50 percent reductions in energy consumption on stand-alone commercial refrigeration equipment by March 27, 2017. For OEMs of stand-alone commercial refrigeration equipment, this placed them among the first to meet the task of compliance. But when you’re an OEM whose core principles are based on environmental sustainability — e.g., JSI Store Fixtures of Bangor, Maine — clearing these regulatory hurdles is just the cost of doing business. In fact, leadership at JSI seized this as an opportunity to revamp its refrigeration platform.

Eager to get out in front of the regulatory deadline, the OEM began working with its component suppliers in 2014 to begin the design, testing and DOE certification processes. At the same time, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed the phase-out of commonly used hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in stand-alone commercial refrigeration equipment — a ruling that would become final in the summer of 2015 with a compliance date of 2019. Like OEMs, this presented a design dilemma for JSI: comply with each regulation separately or combine compliance efforts into a single design cycle.

By tapping Emerson’s regulatory stewardship and its expertise in compressor and electronic controls technology, JSI decided to tackle both DOE and EPA compliance requirements in the same design cycle. First, they worked with Emerson’s Refrigeration and Integrated Products group to develop an optimized, high-efficiency condensing unit that would serve as the basis of its wooden refrigeration fixture platforms.

The condensing unit features Emerson components, including: compressor, flow control and unit controller to facilitate tighter refrigeration control and an efficient assembly process into JSI’s refrigeration equipment. To make sure the new units met required energy objectives, JSI also utilized the DOE test validation and certification services of Emerson’s Design Services Network (DSN).

Completion of design, testing and certification

By the end of Q4 2016, JSI had completed the DOE certification process on 46 of its standard products, well ahead of the 2017 deadline. The effort required the commitment and dedication of the OEM’s strategic suppliers and partners, including an electronically commutated evaporator fan motor manufacturer, a third-party testing provider and Emerson’s DSN resources. In addition, JSI invested in an in-house testing facility where its units were ultimately rated for final certification.

To get out in front of the EPA’s HFC refrigerant ban in 2019, JSI opted to design its new stand-alone units to be “R-448A ready” — as the industry waits for the EPA to list new refrigerants R-448A/449A as acceptable for use through its Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. JSI leadership made this decision based on a desire to align with the general direction the industry was heading and not impose difficult operating and servicing requirements on their customers.

This blog summarizes a success story in our most recent E360 Outlook, entitled Going With the Grain.” Click here to read it in its entirety.

[New E360 Webinar] Evaluating Natural Refrigerant Choices for Small-Format and Foodservice

AllenWicher Allen Wicher | Director, Foodservice Marketing

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Join Us for our next E360 Webinar, Opportunities for Natural Refrigerants in Small-Format Applications on Tuesday, May 16 at 2 p.m. EDT / 11 a.m. PDT.

The growing list of eco-friendly refrigerant options is presenting small-format retail and foodservice operators with difficult decisions. With so many low global warming potential (GWP) options from which to choose — including a wide range of new synthetic blends and a few natural alternatives — these small grocers, convenience stores and restaurants are challenged with selecting a new refrigerant alternative that will serve as the basis for their short- and long-term refrigeration platforms. Behind this difficult decision is an active regulatory climate — one with numerous hurdles to clear in the next five years.

First, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set a phase-out schedule for the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants with high GWP. Second, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established new energy consumption guidelines for specific classes of refrigeration equipment. The net result is a sea change to refrigeration architectures in these segments — one where natural refrigerants propane (or R-290) and CO2 (or R-744) will each play an increasingly vital role.

To make this decision even more complicated, these markets not only utilize the widest variety of equipment and system architectures, they are also faced with understanding new refrigerant requirements in each equipment class. With so many moving pieces, it’s easy to see why there’s an unusually high degree of confusion and uncertainty. Even so, many owner/operators will soon be tasked with selecting a new refrigeration platform. And with numerous EPA and DOE deadlines looming, these decisions must be made quickly.

Among the seemingly ever-expanding variety of refrigeration equipment from which to choose, natural refrigerant-based equipment offer the only true “future proof” options capable of taking current regulatory compliance concerns out of the equation. But questions remain about how these emerging systems compare to their HFC predecessors or newer synthetic refrigerant counterparts.

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Our next E360 Webinar will answer many of these questions. Co-presented by me and Andre Patenaude, director of CO2 business development, this informative session will explore the many considerations operators have when moving to natural refrigerant-based systems. Attendees will learn:

  • Evolution of natural systems from large- to small-format retail
  • Market dynamics driving an increase in urban small-format retail
  • Regulatory implications of R-290 and R-744
  • Cost, performance, safety and servicing impacts of natural systems
  • Equipment and system architectures that utilize natural refrigerants

So, if you are a small-format retail or foodservice operator seeking clarification about natural refrigerants, register now to join me and Andre Patenaude for this discussion on Tuesday, May 16 at 2 p.m. EDT / 11 a.m. PDT.

Europe’s Propane Refrigeration Proliferation

As R-290-based refrigeration becomes more commonplace in the E.U., is the U.S. far behind?

The use of propane (R-290) as a refrigerant in commercial refrigeration is the subject of much debate in the U.S. Its A3, flammable classification conjures up negative connotations in the minds of operators, technicians and public officials alike — beliefs that when examined closer are largely unfounded. But in Europe, the use of R-290 based equipment is well into its second decade and continues to play a big role. Some leading retailers are even making it a cornerstone of their refrigeration portfolio. How this may influence R-290 perceptions and its subsequent adoption in the U.S. remains to be seen. We can, however, evaluate R-290’s early adoption in Europe and speculate on its path toward commercialization in the U.S.

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When it comes to adherence to environmentally sound practices, the European Union (E.U.) and its member countries have consistently been ahead of the curve. The E.U.’s F-gas regulations were among the world’s first actions to phase down hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants in favor of low global warming potential (GWP) natural alternatives. At the same time, consumer, OEM and retailer preferences for sustainable goods and eco-friendly systems contributed to driving compliance with these regulations. It’s no surprise then that Europe has led the way in the adoption of natural refrigerants in commercial refrigeration — including R-290.

From an environmental perspective, R-290 is among an elite class of viable green alternatives to many of the industry’s most common high-GWP refrigerants. It’s a naturally occurring hydrocarbon (HC) with a GWP of 3 and 0 ozone depletion potential (ODP). R-290 is a highly refined grade of the fossil fuel propane, and although flammable, it is non-toxic in nature.

R-290’s green potential doesn’t stop there. Its excellent thermodynamic properties — such as pressure, low back pressure, volumetric capacity, capacity and coefficient of performance — are very similar to R-22, even outperforming it in certain parameters. In Emerson Climate Technologies’ test labs and published studies alike, R-290 consistently outperforms R-404A in energy efficiencies.

In the U.S., the R-290 picture is quite different. The U.S. is generally much more hesitant to view the IEC standard for the 150g charge limit as a rubber stamp to move forward with R-290 commercial refrigeration installations. In the absence of national R-290 safety standards, even applications with small charge limits are subject to the authority of state and local governance, as well as fire marshal jurisdiction — and these differ drastically from region to region.

As a result, commercial adoption has been limited primarily to the most established grocers, foodservice outlets and small format retailers who are 1) willing to absorb the cost required to achieve requisite safety assessments and certifications, and 2) seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives.

In recent years, the U.S. regulatory climate has brought R-290 back into industry and public awareness. First, in 2011 the EPA listed R-290 as acceptable, subject to use conditions, for use in certain commercial refrigeration regulations, keeping the IEC recommendation for a 150g charge limit. More recently, the EPA also instituted the phase-down of R-404A and other common refrigerants over the next several years. On a parallel timetable, the DOE has mandated significant energy reductions in commercial refrigeration equipment, thereby favoring the use of systems and refrigerants that produce high energy efficiencies.

The combination of these two regulations is motivating OEMs and the entire refrigeration supply chain to try and meet both objectives in a single design cycle. While R-290 is one of the few approved refrigerants capable of satisfying both regulatory actions, the lack of a national safety standard is still a barrier toward wider U.S. adoption.

Efforts to establish national standards are in motion, not only for R-290, but potentially for a new class of A2L, (mildly flammable) hydrofluoroolefin refrigerant blends — some of which have yet to be EPA approved. UL, ASHRAE, ISO and IEC are all working to develop and evolve their standards to align with market trends, some of which may be finalized in the coming year.

Even with the existing barriers to R-290 adoption, the EPA approval of R-290 in 2011 prompted some of the larger foodservice and small format retailers to work through their OEMs to introduce light commercial equipment to the market. And with the promise of a true national standard, more OEMs are in the process of developing complete lines of R-290 based equipment.

As the E.U.’s international standards continue to evolve, the industry is appealing for the option to increase the 150g refrigerant charge limit to much higher allowable charges. Should this become enacted, there’s no question it will influence the emerging standards in the U.S., where the possibility of increasing the charge limit to 300g is already being discussed. This would add flexibility to system design and help transition R-290 to larger commercial applications.

One very important question remains to be answered: will the U.S. refrigeration industry allow the many benefits of R-290 to outweigh its perceived risks?

This blog is a summary of the article Europe’s Propane Refrigeration Proliferation from our recent edition of E360 Outlook. Click here to read the article in its entirety.

Allen Wicher
Director of Marketing
Emerson Climate Technologies

 

 

 

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