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Posts tagged ‘Andre Patenaude’

Upgrade Compressors to Extend Commercial Refrigeration System Lifespan

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

ACHR News recently interviewed me for an article titled “Compressor Retrofits on the Rise in Commercial Refrigeration.” It featured a variety of perspectives on the merits of compressor retrofits versus total system replacement. The article can be found here.

When facility energy costs creep up, one of the first suspects is almost always the commercial refrigeration system. It’s a reasonable assumption to make. Over time, it’s very common for energy efficiency to decline as systems drift from their original commissioned performance baselines.

But that doesn’t make a total system replacement inevitable. Many food retailers are reclaiming energy efficiencies by pairing system recommissioning with a measurement and verification (M&V) program and targeted compressor upgrades. In the process, they can reduce energy consumption, improve system performance and reliability and extend the system’s lifespan without the capital investment and business interruption that a full system replacement would require.

Back to the (factory spec) basics

Prolonged use, normal wear and tear and migration from recommended setpoints can degrade efficiency over time. Recommissioning fine-tunes the refrigeration system so that it operates as intended. The process typically involves optimizing every setpoint, cleaning condensers and replacing damaged components. Often, operators can capture significant savings just by recalibrating their system to factory specifications.

Implementing an M&V program ensures those savings are sustainable. Energy-monitoring equipment that delivers real-time insights will help operators ensure their equipment stays in tune. When variances occur, contractors can quickly identify the root cause and address the issue. But just as important, they can use the data generated by the M&V program to make informed decisions on future improvements.

Greater efficiency through variable-capacity modulation

The next step is to enhance energy efficiencies in low- and medium-temperature racks by upgrading to a digital compressor with variable-capacity modulation or by adding a variable frequency drive (VFD). Often, the best candidates for replacement are fixed-capacity compressors that are underperforming or the smallest displacement compressors in each rack.

By adding a variable-capacity digital compressor or VFD to the mix, operators can:

  • Accurately match capacity to changing refrigeration loads
  • Improve case temperature precision
  • Reduce compressor cycling
  • Maintain tighter control over suction manifold pressures

One often overlooked solution is the option to add a VFD to legacy Copeland™ Discus and Copeland™ Scroll fixed-capacity compressors. Perhaps a more common solution is replacing one or even two underperforming fixed-capacity compressors with a digital compressor such as a Copeland Discus Digital or Copeland Scroll Digital compressor — both of which enable variable-capacity modulation to deliver significant energy savings.

When a leading supermarket chain tested the strategy on a 20-year-old, 45,000 square foot grocery store in Ontario, it found that:

  • Recommissioning reduced energy costs by 18%
  • Replacing two weaker units with Copeland Discus compressors reduced energy costs by an additional 16% and qualified the retailer for a local energy incentive program

The entire effort delivered an annual energy savings of more than $40,000.

Proven strategies for every situation

As other contributors to the article note, compressor upgrades (or retrofits) may not always be the right solution for every system. Depending on the age and condition of the equipment, a total system replacement may make more financial sense. This strategy would ensure all system controls and components are integrated and optimized for lower-GWP refrigerants.

Ultimately, choosing between a compressor retrofit or full system replacement should be a data-driven decision that operators make in consultation with their contractors. As a leader in commercial refrigeration and other cold chain technologies, Emerson can help operators maximize their return on that decision. We offer a full suite of components that boost energy efficiency and provide internet of things (IoT) capabilities for retrofits and new equipment alike. Our application engineers are available to answer questions related to refrigeration system performance, retrofit opportunities and strategies for maximizing energy efficiency.

[Webinar Recap] Preparing for the Future of Refrigeration

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Commercial refrigeration architectures are changing. Environmental regulations and corporate sustainability objectives are driving the need for next-generation refrigeration technologies. Today, most commercial refrigeration end users are still operating legacy, centralized direct-expansion (DX) rack systems — which contain refrigerants that either have high global warming potential (GWP) or ozone depletion potential (ODP). In our most recent E360 Webinar, Diego Marafon, refrigeration scroll product manager at Emerson, and I discussed new refrigeration architectures that utilize eco-friendly refrigerants.

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In many countries, regions and U.S. states, the transition from high-GWP refrigerants is underway. While legacy refrigerant options such as hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) R-404A are being phased down, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) such as R-22 are being phased out. To meet sustainability targets, future refrigeration options will utilize a variety of emerging lower-GWP refrigerants, including A1s, A2Ls and natural options such as CO2 and propane.

End users must evaluate a wide range of operational, maintenance and economic criteria when selecting an alternative refrigerant or future refrigeration architecture. Based on Emerson-sponsored research on commercial refrigeration end users, we’ve classified these criteria into six categories called the Six S’s: simple to operate and maintain; environmentally and economically sustainable; stable, reliable performance; secure in terms of both technology and safety perspectives; serviceable without requiring specialized skills or training; and equipped with smart technologies for internet of things (IoT) communication. The levels of importance that each end user places on these factors will determine their selection criteria and the types of systems that meet their business objectives.

Emerging architectures and technologies

Aside from CO2 systems, which have been in use for more than a decade, many of the emerging technologies take a decentralized or distributed approach to system architectures. Overall, this strategy moves the refrigeration equipment closer to the refrigerated cases, requires much less refrigerant charge (and piping), and offers a higher degree of flexibility over centralized DX systems. Here is a brief description of some of the decentralized or distributed architectures we reviewed in the webinar:

Low-charge small scroll racks — These systems have been in place for more than 20 years due to their equipment placement flexibility. Multiple-rack units can be placed in proximity to refrigerated loads, allowing suction pressures to be optimized and drive energy efficiencies. Refrigerant charges are smaller, so leaks can be contained to each rack’s individual circuit. They are capable of using multiple refrigerants with varying lower-GWP ratings.

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) — This well-known approach has been proven for decades and is evolving to meet modern refrigeration needs. OCUs have traditionally been used for smaller refrigeration loads — one unit per load — and many retailers use multiple OCUs to cover individual loads throughout a store. Lower-GWP A1 refrigerants such as R-448/9A can be used for low-temperature applications; low- or medium-pressure refrigerants can be used for medium-temperature applications.

Variable-capacity OCUs — Digital compressors which provide variable-capacity modulation are now being used in OCUs to service multiple refrigeration loads per store. This added range of capacity greatly expands upon traditional remodel and rebuild options — in convenience stores, restaurants, small supermarkets, and click-and-collect operations — and offers the ability to replace three separate condensing units with one. Locating these OCUs in proximity to the refrigerated loads helps keep charge low, allowing them to meet even the most stringent environmental regulations. Variable-capacity modulation enables precise temperature control and excellent load matching capabilities for maximum energy efficiencies. See the Copeland™ Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series for more information.

Distributed micro-booster — This hybrid indoor/outdoor architecture utilizes proven booster technology — typically found in CO2 systems, however new innovative concepts permit the use of low GWP, low-pressure A1 refrigerants for both low- and medium-temperature loads while offering a familiar operation and maintenance footprint. The system utilizes outdoor condensing units for medium-temperature coolers and low-temperature compressors which are located directly on or above the frozen cases. Low-temperature compressors discharge into the nearest medium-temperature suction group, thereby eliminating the need to discharge all the way out to a remote condenser. This allows refrigerant charges and pressures to stay very low, while utilizing one low-GWP A1 refrigerant such as R-513A. Emerson has tested these systems in multiple locations and configurations, where they deliver exceptional performance and energy efficiencies.

Indoor distributed architecture — This flexible configuration utilizes self-contained condensing units located on or near refrigerated cases, islands or prep tables — with refrigerant options, including low-GWP A1s and R-290 (subject to allowable charge limits). Stores with multiple cases can be connected via a shared water or glycol loop to extract heat from each unit and divert it to a remote condenser/cooler. The inherent modular nature of this architecture limits leak rates and keeps charges very low while enabling a very simple, reliable and scalable operational footprint. See the award-winning Copeland Indoor Modular Solution for an end-to-end modular capability that provides seamless integration of refrigeration equipment with Emerson facility controls.

For more detailed information on any of these refrigeration architectures or their enabling technologies, view this webinar in its entirety.

[New E360 Webinar] Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

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Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

 

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Evaluate System Lifecycle Performance When Making the Decision to “Go Green”

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I recently contributed to an ACR News publication with an article which addressed the topic of “green refrigeration.” The article, entitled A Greener Landscape for Commercial Refrigeration, explored why and how operators are making the transition to more eco-friendly refrigeration systems. View the full article here or read a summary below.

As global and national refrigeration industry dynamics continue to rapidly evolve, more business owners and supermarket operators are seeking new refrigerant and equipment alternatives. Ever-changing refrigerant and energy regulations, combined with an increased awareness of the environmental impacts of legacy refrigeration systems, are prompting more stakeholders to explore the green and growing edges of the refrigeration landscape.

But because commercial refrigeration systems can potentially be in service for decades, end users must carefully consider not only today’s regulatory requirements, but also tomorrow’s potential constraints. This means making the most informed equipment decisions possible with the goal of maximizing the investment throughout the system’s lifecycle. Doing so requires a fundamental understanding of the environmental impacts and financial considerations of a commercial refrigeration system.

Total equivalent warming impacts
While today’s regulations are primarily focused on reducing the global warming potential (GWP) from direct emissions of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, it’s also important to remember that the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) also accounts for indirect emissions — or the amount of greenhouse gases generated from the refrigeration system’s energy consumption. It’s estimated that these indirect emissions represent the majority of total climate impacts.

Only by evaluating both energy consumption and refrigerant GWP — including leaks and disposal — over the lifetime of a system can we estimate a system’s full lifecycle climate performance (LCCP).

Environmental and financial sustainability
Operators who are considering going green must also factor in the financial viability and sustainability of new or upgraded refrigeration systems. This means determining not only first costs and installation expenses, but also estimating the long-term maintenance and service requirements.

For manufacturers of these new eco-friendly equipment, components and systems, their task is twofold: 1) utilize lower-GWP refrigerants to meet regulatory requirements, while 2) minimizing ownership and operating costs.

Building a greener future
Like much of the commercial refrigeration industry, Emerson believes that the adoption of environmentally responsible, financially viable refrigeration systems will become more commonplace over the next decade. After all, there is a historic precedent for refrigerant phase-downs, including the ban on ozone-depleting substances which began in the 1990s and is now coming to fruition. Under the authority of the Montreal Protocol and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Act, ozone- depleting substances like R-22 will no longer be manufactured or imported into the U.S. as of Jan. 1, 2020.

Today, the global reduction of fluorinated gases (aka F-gases) is being driven by the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, which has now been ratified by more than 80 countries. As federal regulations continue to take shape and regional mandates become more prevalent throughout the U.S., it seems inevitable that the industry will eventually make the transition to more eco-friendly refrigeration systems.

Emerson has helped support this transition for many years by working with early adopters of low-GWP refrigerants and supporting technologies. Those operators who are taking proactive steps now will have a head start on this transition and be able to provide insights from which the rest of the industry can learn.

Evaluating Sustainable Supermarket Refrigeration Technology

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Progressive Grocer recently interviewed me about Emerson’s and the commercial refrigeration industry’s efforts to help promote the emergence of more sustainable, refrigeration technologies. The complete article can be found here.

Evaluating Sustainable Supermarket Refrigeration Technologyd

It’s not news that supermarkets are under continuous regulatory pressure to not only lower the energy demand of their refrigeration systems, but also to make the transition to low global warming potential (GWP) and zero ozone depletion (ODP) systems. The permanent ban on R-22, long the industry standard, becomes official on January 1, 2020.

What is news is how intensely suppliers and retailers are focused on and sharing information on sustainability initiatives intended to sharply reduce the costs and impact of their refrigeration systems, both in anticipation of future regulations and to attain long-term economic and environmental sustainability.

As different manufacturers approach these issues with a variety of new technology options, the challenge becomes defining new standards for sustainable products and systems, so that the industry can converge on proven, synergistic solutions.

Taking a full system’s approach to sustainability

At Emerson, our approach to sustainability is based on a multi-faceted goal. First, sustain the environment through lower-GWP refrigerant and technology choices. Second, sustain companies financially from a total cost of ownership perspective. And third, focus on energy efficiency as a path to sustainability through forward-looking engineering and the implementation of new monitoring and control technologies, particularly Internet of Things (IoT) capabilities.

At Emerson, we take a full system approach to evaluate the sustainability of new and existing technologies in the context of multiple key selection criteria. This is part of Emerson’s “Six S’s” approach to refrigeration sustainability: simple, serviceable, secure, stable, smart and sustainable.

(To learn more about the rationale, methodology, application and impact of Emerson’s “Six S’s” philosophy, read the blog found here.)

Exploring the potential of natural refrigerants

One area of Emerson’s focus is our work to better understand and then implement emerging natural refrigerants, such as R-744 (carbon dioxide) and R-290 (propane) for different types of applications.

Recent innovations include the development of an integrated display-case architecture. This R-290 system is designed to use one or more compressors and supporting components within cases, removing exhaust heat through a shared water loop — incorporating our expertise in R-290 compressors and our experience with stand-alone condensing units. We’ve also developed a full range of CO2 system technologies, including valves and controls for both small and large applications. For cold storage applications, our modular refrigeration units utilize both CO2 and ammonia-based refrigerant configurations.

Early adopters pave the road to the future

Over the past decade, there have been many retailers committed to testing sustainable refrigeration technologies and low-GWP refrigerants in their stores. For example, the article quoted Wayne Posa of Ahold Delhaize USA, who discussed the company’s transition from R-22, stating: “Food Lion has been committed to zero-ODP and low-GWP refrigerants for several years.”

Different manufacturers are taking different approaches to studying and applying refrigerants and technologies to reach that goal, from the use of hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) refrigerants (such as R-448A and R-450) in distributed refrigeration systems to proven CO2-based system architectures.

In the area of refrigerants — let alone technologies in development for increased energy efficiency and remote monitoring and control — the refrigeration industry continues its search for a new standard. As Brian Beitler of Coolsys, a consulting and contract engineering firm explains, “Between transcritical, ejector systems, NH3 over CO2, cascade, propane, multidistributed and hybrid gas coolers, the jury is still out.”

As we move closer to the most sustainable standard for refrigerants, Emerson continues its work on total refrigeration system sustainability — in refrigerants, energy efficiency, and control — as guided by our “Six S’s” philosophy. This work is our road map to the future.

 

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