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Posts tagged ‘Architectures’

Grow Your Bottom Line With Sustainable Refrigeration Retrofits

Katrina Krites | Marketing and Business Development Manager, Food Retail

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

 

Across the food retail market, supermarket operators are re-evaluating their legacy refrigeration architectures. A dynamic mix of regulatory mandates, sustainability goals and the emergence of e-commerce fulfillment models are dictating changes in the status quo of refrigeration. We recently published an article in the RSES Journal that discussed refrigeration retrofit strategies that allow retailers to meet their sustainability objectives while improving their bottom lines.

When considering refrigeration retrofits, food retailers must remember that sustainability is a two-sided coin. While reducing leaks of global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants is important for lowering direct emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), many supermarket operators often overlook the potential for indirect GHG emissions caused by poor system energy efficiencies.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that supermarkets are the most electricity-intensive of all commercial buildings. Commercial refrigeration systems account for 40–60% of supermarket energy consumption and are by far the greatest contributor to indirect GHG emissions. Combined, direct and indirect emissions make up the true measure of sustainability, or a system’s total equivalent warming impact (TEWI).

Reduce direct emissions with lower-GWP refrigerants

The transition from high-GWP refrigerants and those with ozone depletion potential (ODP) is inevitable. Common legacy refrigerant options such as the HFC R-404A will be phased down while hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) such as R-22 are being phased out. But this does not necessarily mean operators should immediately transition to an alternative refrigerant or embark on a complete refrigeration rebuild.

Lower-GWP A1 refrigerants, such as the hydrofluoroolefin (HFO) blend R-448A/R-449A, are available that allow end-users to retrofit their existing system, reduce GWP from direct emissions by up to 60%, and still maintain a familiar operational footprint similar to the one they have today.

For those operators currently using R-22, the transition to R-448A/R-449A is relatively straightforward and requires very few substantive architecture changes. The transition from R-404A to R-448A/R-449A is slightly more involved but can still be accomplished without significant architectural changes. R-448A/R-449A produces compressor discharge temperatures that run approximately 10–12% higher than R-404A. This may require additional compressor cooling mitigation such as head cooling fans, demand cooling modules, or a liquid or vapor injected scroll compressor. Consult your compressor OEM’s guidelines for specific retrofit procedures.

Improve system energy efficiencies

Any system retrofit or upgrade comes at a cost, so food retailers must ensure their investment delivers long-term viability and returns to their bottom line. This is where reducing indirect emissions by improving energy efficiencies plays such an important role. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that every dollar saved in electricity is equivalent to increasing sales by $59.

While it makes sense to undertake energy-efficiency measures in conjunction with a refrigerant transition, energy optimization best practices can — and should — be performed periodically on all systems. Before considering any retrofit options, start by performing a system assessment to determine your current performance metrics — which in many cases will deviate significantly from the system’s original commissioned baseline.

The next logical step in the energy optimization process is to enable a variable-capacity modulation strategy by either upgrading to a digitally modulated compressor or adding a variable-frequency drive (VFD) to a fixed-capacity compressor. Variable-capacity modulation provides significant system improvements, not just to energy efficiency but also to overall refrigeration system performance, reliability and lifespan. Benefits include:

  • Precise matching of capacity to changing refrigeration loads
  • Tight control over suction manifold pressures, allowing increased setpoint and energy savings
  • Improved case temperature precision
  • Reduced compressor cycling (on/off)

In digital compressor retrofit scenarios, we’ve demonstrated that replacing an underperforming, fixed-capacity compressor with a variable-capacity compressor can result in an additional 4% energy savings — even before activating digital modulation capabilities. And once digital modulation is activated, operators can expect an additional 12% energy savings.

Whether you’re trying to reduce your direct emissions with lower-GWP refrigerants or seeking to improve energy efficiencies and lower your indirect emissions, Emerson has compression technologies and sustainable refrigeration solutions to help you meet your specific objectives. The Copeland™ digital semi-hermetic and Copeland™ digital scroll compressors provide opportunities to transition to lower-GWP refrigerants and enable variable-capacity modulation to drive energy efficiencies.

Raising the Bar on Innovation for Distributed Architectures

DiegoMarafon Diego Marafon | Refrigeration Scroll Product Manager

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

The food retail industry is undergoing a dramatic transformation. To stay competitive, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and store operators need solutions that promote integration, provide flexibility, but most importantly, produce relevant data insights. With the Copeland™ Indoor Modular Solution, Emerson has created the first end-to-end solution to the industry’s most pressing refrigeration challenges. Read more about this groundbreaking innovation in our recent E360 Product Spotlight.

Raising the Bar on Innovation for Distributed Architectures

Consumer preferences are prompting the creation of new — and often smaller — store formats. Corporate sustainability goals and environmental regulations are driving the expansion of new refrigeration technologies. And retailers need meaningful operational and energy performance data now — rather than after equipment fails, food safety is put at risk or higher-than-expected utility bills come rolling in.

OEMs and store operators require a smarter and more adaptable foundation on which to build for the future. In response, Emerson has introduced the Copeland Indoor Modular Solution. A 2020 AHR Innovation Award finalist, it seamlessly integrates refrigeration equipment with Emerson facility controls. It is the industry’s first all-in-one offering that includes hardware, software and services.

More capabilities in a low-profile package

Emerson’s Copeland™ Scroll variable speed compressors are trusted by OEMs for their superior reliability, efficiency, variable capacity and quiet operation. Likewise, Emerson’s ProAct™ Connect+ enterprise management software and lifecycle services help operators across the spectrum to unlock the full potential of their data.

The Copeland Indoor Modular Solution combines both to deliver:

  • High-caliber performance: The low-profile, quiet system enhances in-store customer experiences while the highly efficient modules perform well above the Department of Energy consumption targets for commercial refrigeration equipment.
  • Real-time access to data: Advanced electronics that easily integrate with facility controls help operators’ to monitor, triage and respond to issues.
  • Enterprise-level visibility: Remote monitoring of refrigeration, HVAC, lighting and other assets helps operators achieve their food quality, safety and energy performance goals.
  • Project certainty: Emerson-authorized technicians facilitate on-time, on-budget store launches.
  • Exceptional support: Emerson supports operators throughout the life of their stores with systems integration, commissioning, maintenance and aftermarket services.

Demonstrated value across the supply chain

The Copeland Indoor Modular Solution is designed for stores seeking to deploy distributed architectures. As a low-cost, small-footprint and low-maintenance alternative to traditional  large centralized systems and remote systems, it offers the adaptability that OEMs and operators require in today’s marketplace. But don’t let its slim profile deceive you. The Copeland Indoor Modular Solution is a workhorse that delivers advantages across the entire supply chain:

  • OEMs benefit from the configurability of Copeland products and a plug-in approach that accelerates time to market.
  • Store owners and operators benefit from Emerson technologies that can lower operating costs, provide precise refrigeration loads, help to prevent food loss, maximize merchandising space and ensure optimal in-store experiences.
  • Enterprise managers benefit from easy-to-deploy, standard refrigeration modules that minimize startup complexities and enable scalability for new stores; they also gain key insights into store performance, historic trends and outliers.

The industry-wide changes that are pushing OEMs and operators to be more flexible and adaptable are made more complicated by their interconnected nature. The innovative pairing of our comprehensive refrigeration portfolios with our proven solutions expertise equips stakeholders with the best toolset to overcome these challenges. In this respect, the Copeland Indoor Modular Solution is more than a data-driven solution.

Learn more about how the Copeland Indoor Modular Solution is setting a new standard for cold chain integration and automation by reading the full E360 article.

[New E360 Webinar] Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

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Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

 

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

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