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Posts tagged ‘Climate Conversation’

Meeting the Comfort and Efficiency Needs of Restaurants

Anyone who has ever eaten in a hot, humid restaurant would agree – comfort is critical to enjoying any dining experience. Restaurants face tough air conditioning challenges. Food preparation areas produce significant humidity from dish washing, cooking and hot beverage service. Just a few feet away from the kitchen, customers and staff want a comfortable environment. This imbalance often creates humidity control problems, temperature swings, and over-cooling by traditional packaged rooftop units that cycle on and off. To function effectively, the air conditioning system must closely match a range of latent and sensible loads.

Meeting the Comfort and Efficiency Needs of Restaurants

Restaurant operators understand that the comfort of the customers and staff is important to creating a desirable environment. But they also have to keep a close eye on the budget. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, restaurants use about 5-7 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings, such as office buildings and retail stores. High-volume quick-service restaurants may even use up to 10 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings. Next to refrigeration, heating and cooling systems account for the largest portion of a restaurant’s annual energy use.

In restaurants, both a comfortable environment and energy costs matter a great deal. Restaurant operators cannot afford to waste their operating budget on high energy costs driven by oversized mechanical equipment. Recent advances in HVAC controls technology and capacity modulation methods are now featured on equipment that can closely match variable loads that are common in restaurants. These facilities require equipment that can effectively and efficiently cool or heat large spaces when they are filled with people, large spaces with just a few people, or during food preparation – a real design challenge. These modern HVAC systems with capacity modulation can quickly pay for themselves in restaurants simply through the energy savings generated from modulating back in off-peak conditions. These systems also provide optimum comfort during both peak and non-peak periods.

HVACR compressor manufacturers strive to deliver high levels of efficiency, comfort, and reliability in a market that also demands affordability and compliance with environmental laws. Today, a complicated combination of regulatory requirements and customer preferences is driving manufacturers to achieve unprecedented levels of compressor efficiency without sacrificing reliability and comfort.

Compressor suppliers have responded to this demand by providing innovative products that can help air conditioning original equipment manufacturers improve system efficiency. This is achieved through modulating capacity technologies where the cooling capacity of the system is tied to the load, not an application’s peak requirements. Modulation makes it possible to tailor compressor performance to changes in ambient and varying load conditions, which eliminates big swings in temperature and relative humidity levels throughout a building.

These innovative products address the key needs of facilities where comfort and operating costs are critical to the success of the organization. Ask your equipment distributor or contractor about new modulating capacity cooling systems for the most comfortable environment and the lowest energy costs.

For more information go to http://www.ac-heatingconnect.com/meeting-comfort-efficiency-needs-restaurants/#sthash.ow0Jw4o5.dpuf

Brian Buynacek, PE, LEED AP
Sr. Refrigeration Engineer
Emerson Climate Technologies

TAC Panels Make Sense of Refrigerants, Operational Visibility and Energy-Reduction Technologies

With our Technology in Action Conference only one week away, we’re eagerly anticipating a series of informative sessions that will allow attendees to interact with the industry’s leading retail refrigeration experts. Building on the success of last year’s format, we’ve once again designed the conference to encourage participation and foster lively debates about the most pressing topics in refrigeration today.

For this year’s theme, we’re adopting the Making Sense webinar platform, selecting topics that are closely related to refrigerants, operation visibility and energy-reduction technologies. And, we’ve once again invited a wide spectrum of experienced end users, expert practitioners and equipment manufacturers to facilitate these discussions and impart their knowledge.

Here’s a brief overview of our interactive sessions:

Discussion One: Optimizing Facility Operational Costs. Explore the landscape of available strategies, tools, services and equipment to help achieve operational cost effectiveness today. Panelists will discuss how these tools can help retailers achieve their facility’s cost reduction goals. Discussion points include:

  • Factors to consider when optimizing a facility
  • Optimizing project development and prioritization
  • Challenges to achieving facility optimization
  • Optimization strategies, tools, equipment and services

Discussion Two: The Case for Case Control. By shifting centralized control of refrigeration operation to individual cases, retailers can significantly reduce energy costs. Learn why case control has not been more widely adopted in the U.S., and explore the implications of case control installation and operation.

  • Installation cost savings and contractor considerations
  • Potential for energy savings
  • Maintenance and commissioning
  • Refrigerant usage

Discussion Three: The Impact of New Air Conditioning Efficiency Standards. Changes to regulations in 2015–2016 will increase the minimum efficiency levels of air conditioning equipment. Learn more about these regulations, review the available technologies, and discuss the implications for both air conditioning equipment and facility design.

  • Changes to the ASHRAE 90.1 standard (and the timing)
  • Importance of full-load and part-load efficiencies
  • Understanding the impacts of voluntary standards (ENERGY STAR™, Consortium for Energy Efficiencies, and others)
  • Equipment design implications (circuit design, variable capacity compressors, expansion valves, etc.)

Discussion Four: Refrigerants — An Asset or Liability? Changes in regulations that mandate refrigerant use are impacting refrigeration architecture in new and existing stores. Learn which refrigerants to use for retrofits and new system designs, in addition to these important discussion points:

  • Best practices in refrigerant management for existing stores
  • A new way of thinking about refrigerants (no longer just an expense item)
  • Establishing a plan to reduce global warming emissions (including R-22 and R404A retrofits)
  • Regulatory and political forces that will impact existing store refrigerant decisions

This event takes place April 14–16 in Point Clear, Ala. Visit www.emersontac.org to learn more. While at the event, we will be tweeting live discussion updates using the hashtag #EmersonTAC. We hope you will be able to join the conversations!

Mitch Knapke
Refrigeration Market Manager, Supermarkets
Emerson Climate Technologies

Don’t Let Your Retail Business Get a Flat Tire

Does your car tell you when it’s time for an oil change or if tire pressure is low? Armed with this information, you don’t wait for a major auto “failure” before you act—you use condition based maintenance.

It’s the same for your retail business. Wouldn’t you rather do maintenance based on equipment condition before it deteriorates to the point where it may fail if not serviced?

Condition Based Maintenance can answer questions like
•    Which of my refrigeration systems are operating improperly or inefficiently?
•    Which of my refrigeration systems are leaking refrigerant?
•    How can I implement a better preventative maintenance scheme or optimize maintenance dispatches?
•    Where should I focus my maintenance budget?

The best news about Condition Based Maintenance is that many retailers already have most of the equipment needed installed already. Products like Emerson E2 controllers, Copeland Scroll™ compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics™, temperature and pressure sensors are increasingly being installed as standard equipment in many retail operations today.

Connecting our Condition Based Maintenance software and service architecture is the final step many retailers need to take to ensure they are safely driving their business.

For more information about Condition Based Maintenance, view my presentation from Emerson’s Technology in Action Conference.

Jim Mitchell
Product Manager, Retail Solutions
Emerson Climate Technologies

Commercial Building Energy Specifications

The DOE and CBEA have some useful technology specifications out, and many more in the works.  The concept is similar to ENERGY STAR – the equipment buyer now has a guide to the most energy efficient equipment.  Besides listing products that meet the specification, they also list available incentives for the end user.  If you are a commercial or retail operator or manager, check out the work that the CBEA is doing around commercial refrigeration and air conditioning.   The list of retailers participating in the program is impressive.  The working group for refrigeration is involved in many of the same activities that we are – new refrigeration systems and components, including display cases, coolers and freezers, compressor systems, and controls.  If you are involved in selection or specification of equipment, do you find these specifications useful?  Are you searching for the most energy efficient equipment?  Let us know.

For more information on the CBEA: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/commercial/cbea.html

Rajan Rajendran, Ph.D
Vice President, Engineering Services and Sustainability
Emerson Climate Technologies

Display Case Energy Standards

If you are involved with refrigerated display cases you might have heard about a new bill before congress called the BURR Act or Better Use of Refrigerator Regulations # H.R. 5710.  This would amend the EPACT 2005, DOE 10 CFR 431 for the portions pertaining to self-contained, medium temperature, service over counter display cases.  This equipment is now classified as a reach-in refrigerator per the DOE 2010 portion of the energy standards.  But because this style of case is all glass and uses a lot of lighting for display of product it has a large heat load as compared to a reach-in, and cannot meet the standards.

If this bill passes the service over counter (SOC) will have its own class and the energy calculation will be based on TDA (total display area) like all the cases covered by DOE 2012 which included SOC remote and ice cream cases. What this means is that the SOC.SC.M cases will now have a chance at meeting the energy standards.

Energy standards have been in place for reach-in refrigerators for many years, including federal minimum efficiency levels which are now in effect.   They were mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and manufacturers responded.  Since OEMs had already been working on ENERGY STAR models from 2001, it was not a stretch to hit the federal minimum.

The Air Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration NEWS recently reported on this legislation.
http://www.achrnews.com/articles/120781-legislation-could-establish-unique-standards-for-deli-style-refrigerators

Again, depending on the class of equipment, the calculations defined in the energy standards might be based on refrigerated volume, or could be based on total display area.  This is true for ENERGY STAR and other calculations as well, so be aware of what class of equipment is being considered because allowable energy consumption can vary greatly.

Rajan Rajendran, Ph.D
Vice President, Engineering Services and Sustainability
Emerson Climate Technologies

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