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Posts tagged ‘connected kitchen’

Connected Kitchens Require Clear Project Scoping and Definition

Paul_Hepperla Paul Hepperla | Vice President, Solutions Integration – Foodservice

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I recently presented an E360 Webinar that discussed “The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens;” this blog is a commentary on aspects of that discussion. Click here to view this session.

According to the Gartner Hype Cycle, the concept of the Internet of Things (IoT) is one that’s full of promise and currently resides in their “peak of inflated expectations” stage. By their estimations, there will be 20 billion connected devices by 2020, and IoT will achieve mainstream adoption nationwide within 5–10 years. Today, however, only 26 percent of U.S. companies are successful with their IoT initiatives; 60 percent believe that while IoT looks good on paper, implementing it is more complex than expected.

In a recent E360 Webinar titled, The Risks and Rewards of Connecting Commercial Kitchens, I explored the current state of IoT in the foodservice sector from both equipment manufacturer and end user perspectives. While many companies are participating in field trials to test the potential business applications of IoT, the majority of these efforts are taking place without a defined strategy or comprehensive understanding of how IoT may fundamentally change their respective business.

From my experience, I’ve found that this lack of direction is the culprit behind most unsuccessful IoT initiatives. Remedying this problem is often as easy as answering a simple question: “What problem are we trying to solve?” Selecting a relevant problem that’s negatively impacting the business or its key stakeholders is a logical start.

But seeking data without regard to what value it can bring is a problem shared by many early IoT efforts. While it’s tempting to let the availability of the technology completely dictate the solution, the result is what I refer to as “the internet of broken things.” So how do we avoid these pitfalls?

In the webinar, I discussed what constitutes a successful IoT strategy and introduced an approach that Emerson refers to as “smart systems.” Smart systems consider the interdependence and relationships between all aspects of a connected offering that includes technology while also factoring in user experiences, business models and the specific markets we’re serving. For example, in foodservice, we often reference the concept of a connected kitchen. Taking a smart system approach to a connected kitchen means understanding various factors:

  • How end users and operators interact and interface with the connected equipment
  • The decentralization of brand control with respect to how operators may interact with equipment, which can complicate data collection
  • The relationship between manufacturer and end user, including the potential for commercializing a service model
  • Manufacturer visibility into equipment performance to allow for continuous design improvements

You can see that even before entering into a discussion of specific technologies, IoT represents a significant transformation in the way foodservice operators conduct business. For manufacturers, it’s an opportunity to gain tremendous insights into their products. But until IoT addresses the most critical problems in the foodservice sector, the opportunities for widespread adoption will be limited. Emerson not only has the technologies to implement connected kitchen solutions, we have a deep understanding of what manufacturers and end users need to create successful IoT programs.

Connected Kitchens are What’s Next for Convenience Stores

In a recent article for Convenience Store News, I discussed the connected equipment and technologies convenience stores must adopt to succeed with foodservice. Below are some of the highlights.

Today’s consumer is increasingly food conscious and more discriminating about their dining choices. To remain competitive and gain market share, convenience stores are creating or expanding their foodservice kitchens and offering a new menu of fresher, healthier foods.

The addition of new kitchen equipment is one more system for operators to manage in their stores. Expanding into foodservice can increase revenue, but it also creates a more complex store environment to navigate. Equipment management for kitchens becomes even more important as productivity and food quality can directly affect the customer experience, and ultimately the bottom line.

Connected Kitchen

Early adopters of the connected kitchen system are seeing additional strategic advantages to menu broadcast. As they are facing competition from other convenience store brands, and from quick-serve restaurants and supermarkets offering foodservice, efficient menu adaptability is increasingly valuable.

Read the full article online here.

To learn about connected kitchens for Quick Serve Restaurants, check out this blog post.

Jeff Zazzara
Director of Foodservice, Enterprise Product Management
Emerson Climate Technologies Retail Solutions

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