Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Emerson Climate Technologies’

Live From AHR: Making Sense of Embedded Electronics

Panel Provides Insights on Interoperability of Electronics in HVACRAHR Expo Live Webinar

While exhibiting at the 2015 AHR Expo, Emerson Climate Technologies held its eleventh installment of the company’s Making Sense webinar series.

Read more

Meeting the Comfort and Efficiency Needs of Restaurants

Anyone who has ever eaten in a hot, humid restaurant would agree – comfort is critical to enjoying any dining experience. Restaurants face tough air conditioning challenges. Food preparation areas produce significant humidity from dish washing, cooking and hot beverage service. Just a few feet away from the kitchen, customers and staff want a comfortable environment. This imbalance often creates humidity control problems, temperature swings, and over-cooling by traditional packaged rooftop units that cycle on and off. To function effectively, the air conditioning system must closely match a range of latent and sensible loads.

Meeting the Comfort and Efficiency Needs of Restaurants

Restaurant operators understand that the comfort of the customers and staff is important to creating a desirable environment. But they also have to keep a close eye on the budget. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, restaurants use about 5-7 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings, such as office buildings and retail stores. High-volume quick-service restaurants may even use up to 10 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings. Next to refrigeration, heating and cooling systems account for the largest portion of a restaurant’s annual energy use.

In restaurants, both a comfortable environment and energy costs matter a great deal. Restaurant operators cannot afford to waste their operating budget on high energy costs driven by oversized mechanical equipment. Recent advances in HVAC controls technology and capacity modulation methods are now featured on equipment that can closely match variable loads that are common in restaurants. These facilities require equipment that can effectively and efficiently cool or heat large spaces when they are filled with people, large spaces with just a few people, or during food preparation – a real design challenge. These modern HVAC systems with capacity modulation can quickly pay for themselves in restaurants simply through the energy savings generated from modulating back in off-peak conditions. These systems also provide optimum comfort during both peak and non-peak periods.

HVACR compressor manufacturers strive to deliver high levels of efficiency, comfort, and reliability in a market that also demands affordability and compliance with environmental laws. Today, a complicated combination of regulatory requirements and customer preferences is driving manufacturers to achieve unprecedented levels of compressor efficiency without sacrificing reliability and comfort.

Compressor suppliers have responded to this demand by providing innovative products that can help air conditioning original equipment manufacturers improve system efficiency. This is achieved through modulating capacity technologies where the cooling capacity of the system is tied to the load, not an application’s peak requirements. Modulation makes it possible to tailor compressor performance to changes in ambient and varying load conditions, which eliminates big swings in temperature and relative humidity levels throughout a building.

These innovative products address the key needs of facilities where comfort and operating costs are critical to the success of the organization. Ask your equipment distributor or contractor about new modulating capacity cooling systems for the most comfortable environment and the lowest energy costs.

For more information go to http://www.ac-heatingconnect.com/meeting-comfort-efficiency-needs-restaurants/#sthash.ow0Jw4o5.dpuf

Brian Buynacek, PE, LEED AP
Sr. Refrigeration Engineer
Emerson Climate Technologies

MAKING SENSE of Refrigerated Marine Container Management

The global cold chain container business is fraught with challenges that can incrementally chip away at an operator’s profit margins. Whether it’s at storage, in trip preparation, sitting dockside, en route or at loading/unloading points, there are any number of occasions where your refrigerated marine container fleet can be compromised — and the integrity of cargo itself placed in jeopardy. Manual reefer inspections, container malfunctions that lead to spoiled cargo and human error can quickly add up to shrinking profits.

Refrigerated marine container operators need an edge to stay ahead of the competition and maintain profitability. The difference between surviving and thriving in this environment is a matter of managing the smallest details, maximizing energy and operational efficiencies, and promoting human safety.

Join Our Next Webinar, Tuesday, July 8 at 9 a.m. EDT, 3 p.m. CEST

In our next MAKING SENSE webinar, we will explore how to gain this competitive advantage in a discussion entitled: Improving Refrigerated Marine Container Management With Pervasive Connectivity. The webinar will present Emerson Climate Technologies’ approach to maximizing global cold chain efficiencies through our advanced hardware and software solutions for refrigerated marine container fleets. We will explain how reefer management systems installed on these containers enable remote diagnostics, establish efficient operations and help maintain perfect cargo conditions. The topics covered will include:

  • Reducing operational costs and eliminating manual operations
  • Improving cargo quality with proactive alerts
  • Reducing human error and improving safety
  • Achieving energy savings and reducing CO2 emissions

This educational webinar will be presented by Robert Svensson, marketing manager at Emerson Climate Technologies — Transportation Solutions, ApS, a business of Emerson. Robert initially joined the Marine Container and Boiler business of Johnson Controls, Inc. (which Emerson acquired in April 2012) as a product manager for ISO10368 remote monitoring, but has since assumed responsibility for strategic planning, marketing and product management at Emerson Climate Technologies — Transportation Solutions.

Join Robert on Tuesday, July 8 at 9 a.m. EDT, 3 p.m. CEST for his expert perspective on refrigerated marine container management. Register now by visiting our website at: www.emersonclimate.com/makingsensewebinars. We’re helping the industry MAKE SENSE of the issues that matter most.

Craig Raney
Director of Marketing, Refrigeration
Emerson Climate Technologies

Five Things Your Boss Wants You to Know About Commercial Air Conditioning Regulations

Did you know 20-40 percent of current 6-60 ton commercial package and split systems don’t meet new 2016 efficiency minimums? Your boss may not be aware of the changes coming, but it’s a fair guess that he or she expects their team of HVAC professionals to be current on upcoming industry changes.

Photo: (L to R) Bart Powelson and Karl Zellmer of Emerson, Richard Lord of UTC, Cindy Sparrow of Lennox, Frank Vadino of Cold Technology.

Photo: (L to R) Bart Powelson and Karl Zellmer of Emerson, Richard Lord of UTC, Cindy Sparrow of Lennox, Frank Vadino of Cold Technology.

At our Technology in Action Conference last month, we brought together industry leaders to talk about the effect of new air conditioning efficiency standards on contractors, manufacturers and our customers.

During the course of our lively discussion, five key points emerged:

  1. To understand new efficiency regulations on commercial air conditioning systems, you need to know how they are being measured. The ASHRAE 90.1-2013 standards include a 13-15 percent increase in Integrated Energy Efficiency Ratio (IEER) for air cooled package/split systems. IEER is a measure of part load efficiency using a weighted average of efficiencies at various system capacities and conditions.Rather than looking at EER, which had been the industry standard for decades, the regulations, which are expected to go into effect in 2016 are focusing on performance across a range of conditions, since typical systems spend most of their time running at 50-70 percent load capacity.
  2. The emphasis on part-load efficiency has a great side effect: improved comfort. When it comes to evaluating the performance of an HVAC system, regulatory agencies are focused on energy use, bosses usually care about costs, but let’s not forget that visitors to your store or building care mostly about comfort. Fortunately, the new efficiency standards can serve all three needs. A minimum standard measurement that more accurately reflects how systems run leads to more efficient equipment that will both save on energy use and cost, but also include capacity modulation that can lower humidity and maintain more consistent temperatures.
  3. Manufacturers and OEMs have your back and are developing the technology to support the new efficiency minimum standards. While you (and your boss) may be just now coming up to speed on the standards for 2016, many OEMs and manufacturers have been preparing for the new standards for years. Introducing capacity modulation with tandems and variable speed compressors will be the trend to improve part-load performance.
  4. Don’t forget to review rebates and voluntary standards. Voluntary standards like Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) and the U.S. Green Building Council are pushing the upper end of the spectrum, creating guides and benchmarks beyond minimum standards.Be sure to impress the boss with your knowledge of energy rebates available on a national and state-by-state basis by visiting the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.
  5.  Training is key. Staying current on the latest developments in technology will be key to helping ensure equipment is running efficiently. Connect with OEMs and manufacturers for training on the equipment your team will be servicing and installing.

Bart Powelson
Director of Commercial Marketing, Air Conditioning Business
Emerson Climate Technologies

TAC Panels Make Sense of Refrigerants, Operational Visibility and Energy-Reduction Technologies

With our Technology in Action Conference only one week away, we’re eagerly anticipating a series of informative sessions that will allow attendees to interact with the industry’s leading retail refrigeration experts. Building on the success of last year’s format, we’ve once again designed the conference to encourage participation and foster lively debates about the most pressing topics in refrigeration today.

For this year’s theme, we’re adopting the Making Sense webinar platform, selecting topics that are closely related to refrigerants, operation visibility and energy-reduction technologies. And, we’ve once again invited a wide spectrum of experienced end users, expert practitioners and equipment manufacturers to facilitate these discussions and impart their knowledge.

Here’s a brief overview of our interactive sessions:

Discussion One: Optimizing Facility Operational Costs. Explore the landscape of available strategies, tools, services and equipment to help achieve operational cost effectiveness today. Panelists will discuss how these tools can help retailers achieve their facility’s cost reduction goals. Discussion points include:

  • Factors to consider when optimizing a facility
  • Optimizing project development and prioritization
  • Challenges to achieving facility optimization
  • Optimization strategies, tools, equipment and services

Discussion Two: The Case for Case Control. By shifting centralized control of refrigeration operation to individual cases, retailers can significantly reduce energy costs. Learn why case control has not been more widely adopted in the U.S., and explore the implications of case control installation and operation.

  • Installation cost savings and contractor considerations
  • Potential for energy savings
  • Maintenance and commissioning
  • Refrigerant usage

Discussion Three: The Impact of New Air Conditioning Efficiency Standards. Changes to regulations in 2015–2016 will increase the minimum efficiency levels of air conditioning equipment. Learn more about these regulations, review the available technologies, and discuss the implications for both air conditioning equipment and facility design.

  • Changes to the ASHRAE 90.1 standard (and the timing)
  • Importance of full-load and part-load efficiencies
  • Understanding the impacts of voluntary standards (ENERGY STAR™, Consortium for Energy Efficiencies, and others)
  • Equipment design implications (circuit design, variable capacity compressors, expansion valves, etc.)

Discussion Four: Refrigerants — An Asset or Liability? Changes in regulations that mandate refrigerant use are impacting refrigeration architecture in new and existing stores. Learn which refrigerants to use for retrofits and new system designs, in addition to these important discussion points:

  • Best practices in refrigerant management for existing stores
  • A new way of thinking about refrigerants (no longer just an expense item)
  • Establishing a plan to reduce global warming emissions (including R-22 and R404A retrofits)
  • Regulatory and political forces that will impact existing store refrigerant decisions

This event takes place April 14–16 in Point Clear, Ala. Visit www.emersontac.org to learn more. While at the event, we will be tweeting live discussion updates using the hashtag #EmersonTAC. We hope you will be able to join the conversations!

Mitch Knapke
Refrigeration Market Manager, Supermarkets
Emerson Climate Technologies

%d bloggers like this: