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Posts tagged ‘Energy Efficiency’

Introducing Copeland™ Variable Speed Reciprocating Hermetic Compressors for Refrigeration

Derek Langenkamp | Product Manager, Hermetic Reciprocating

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solution’s Business

Making equipment design changes to meet increasing energy efficiency standards is nothing new for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the commercial refrigeration space. For quite some time, the medium- and low-temperature, stand-alone coolers and freezers commonly used in restaurants, convenience stores (C-stores) and small-format food retailers have been key targets of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) energy efficiency mandates. Because highly efficient compression technologies are among the few design options left to help OEMs meet these targets, Emerson is pleased to announce its Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line designed specifically for this purpose. For full details, you can read our latest E360 Product Spotlight.

While our industry expects that the DOE will soon be proposing its next phase-down in energy reductions for these applications — which are likely to take effect in 2024 — the need for highly reliable, energy-efficient compressors extends well beyond commercial refrigeration. In fact, OEMs in the environmental life sciences, medical and pharmaceutical industries can also benefit from the high efficiency and reliable performance of the Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line. In addition, many OEMs are also seeking a competitive edge by offering equipment that achieves ENERGY STAR® certification. The range of applications across these industries includes:

  • Medium- and low-temperature stand-alone refrigerators and freezers, including ultra-low temperature (ULT) freezers
  • Island cases
  • Display cases
  • Ice machines
  • Food prep tables
  • Medical equipment
  • Process chillers

Superior energy efficiency and refrigeration performance

Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressors are designed to deliver significant efficiency and performance improvements for commercial refrigeration reach-in OEMs. This low-profile, variable speed solution is comprised of two components:

  1. Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor — available in ranges from ⅛ to ⅞ HP; featuring a brushless permanent magnet (BPM) motor vs. a standard induction motor
  2. Variable speed (VS) drive with a smart controller — includes serial, frequency and drop-in modes; drop-in mode serves as the system controller

Standalone, reach-in freezer optimized and tested with Emerson components and controls, under EPA-approved test lab for the ENERGY STAR® program per ASHRAE 72 and DOE energy testing requirements showed:

  • System efficiency increased by 13% by replacing fixed speed compressor with variable speed solution
  • Compressor cycling reduced by 90%
  • Compression ratio relaxed by as much as 43%
  • Manufacturer exceeds ENERGY STAR performance levels
  • Utilizes a future-oriented, low-GWP natural refrigerant

For end users of this enhanced refrigeration equipment, these efficiencies can result in:

  • Faster pull-downs to setpoint temperatures
  • More precise temperature holding
  • Less wear and tear on system components
  • Lower energy bills

In addition, the breadth of the Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line gives system design engineers a variety of compressor options with which to achieve significant energy efficiency improvements for refrigeration equipment of varying types and sizes.

The regulatory advantages of R-290

The Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line is designed to utilize R-290, a natural refrigerant, with an ultra-low global warming potential (GWP) of 3. This allows OEMs to offer their customers a refrigeration option that meets some of the most stringent refrigerant and energy efficiency regulations to date, such as:

  1. Potential impending DOE 2024 standard
  2. California Air Resources Board (CARB)
  3. Potential Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) refrigerant requirements
  4. ENERGY STAR® certification

Emerson’s test labs have confirmed that the use of R-290 in variable speed compressors can deliver superior annual energy efficiency ratio (EER) ratings compared to using R-404A in a fixed-speed compressor.

Helping OEMs meet DOE 2024 and beyond

The estimated timeline for the DOE’s next phase-down in commercial refrigeration equipment energy consumption is 2024. If current equipment does not meet DOE requirements, most OEMs will soon need to integrate new components into their next design cycle to comply with the next generation of energy reduction mandates.

The Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line delivers the energy efficiency levels that will help your equipment meet the upcoming DOE requirements — all while giving your customers the reliability and performance improvements they’ll need to succeed. With our extensive design and testing resources, Emerson can help to guide you through this transition. We’re ready to help you meet the next round of DOE efficiency standards and beyond — and achieve the ENERGY STAR® certification to differentiate you from your competitors. Visit our website to learn more about the Copeland variable speed reciprocating hermetic compressor line.

 

[New E360 Webinar] Will Provide Regulatory Update on Refrigerant Rulemaking and Climate Initiatives

Jennifer Butsch | Regulatory Affairs Director

Emerson’s Commercial & Residential Solutions Business

The environmental regulations landscape continues to be a source of great uncertainty for the commercial refrigeration and AC industries. Sorting through the latest developments in an ever-evolving mix of global policy, federal and state rulemaking — for both refrigerant and energy efficiency regulations — is a complicated task. In our next E360 webinar, my colleague Dr. Rajan Rajendran, Emerson’s vice president of systems innovation center and sustainability, and I will explore recent regulatory activities and help you to understand their potential impacts on your business. The webinar will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m. EST/11 a.m. PST.

From all indications, 2021 is shaping up to be a transitional year among the federal and state regulations governing commercial refrigeration and AC applications in the U.S. At the federal level, the recent enactment of the American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2020 (AIM Act) gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to phase down the consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants and establish sector-based limits. In addition, the introduction of the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Rule 23 proposal in 2020 was an indication of the agency’s desire to approve certain mildly flammable (A2L) refrigerants as acceptable for use — subject to use conditions — in new residential and light commercial air conditioners and heat pumps.

For several years, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has stepped up its efforts to phase down the use of HFC refrigerants. This started with the adoption of EPA SNAP Rules 20 and 21 and now continues with a proposal that calls for increased HFC and refrigerant global warming potential (GWP) reductions, which could take effect as soon as January 1, 2022. As a result, retailers in California may soon face the prospect of making significant changes to their refrigeration systems — in at least some of their stores — to achieve compliance.

While retailers outside of the state of California currently may not face an imminent regulatory mandate, member states of the U.S. Climate Alliance are moving forward with their own HFC phase-down initiatives, which include the adoption of EPA SNAP Rules 20 and 21. And with a new administration taking office, we are also likely to see a new tone and urgency with respect to broader climate initiatives, as well as the potential for greater participation in global environmental policies.

All these moving pieces set the stage for a potentially active period of regulatory developments in 2021 and beyond. The primary goals of our upcoming E360 webinar are to explore these developments in more detail, place them into their proper context, and offer insights to help you understand the impacts on your business.

Attendees will learn:

  • Status of CARB regulations/proposals and their potential impacts
  • Review of U.S. Climate Alliance state activities and adoption of EPA SNAP Rules 20 and 21
  • Overview of AIM Act and its potential impacts
  • Update on the codes and standards for flammable refrigerants, such as UL 60335-2-89 and ASHRAE 15
  • Impacts that a new administration may have on climate initiatives

Register now for this informative and free webinar.

Evaluating Supermarket Energy Management Strategies

JamesJackson_Blog_Image James Jackson | Business Development Manager
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

I recently authored an article for Facility Executive that discussed how energy management systems (EMS) are helping to reshape how the food retail industry approaches energy efficiency and demand planning. Read the full article here.

Evaluating Supermarket Energy Management Strategies

Corporations and consumers alike are always looking for ways to reduce energy costs. Nowhere is this more applicable than in supermarkets, where chains have many energy optimization opportunities among refrigeration, HVAC and lighting systems. The average 50,000 square foot store incurs $200,000 in annual energy costs, resulting in 1,900 tons of CO2 emissions (the equivalent of 360 vehicles) in one year. Of these costs, refrigeration and lighting account for more than 50 percent of total energy usage.

As the energy and utilities sectors continue to evolve, traditional approaches to energy management and demand response must also adapt to the changing landscape. Fortunately, with advances in EMS and controls technologies, food retailers can apply automation to achieve energy best practices. These tools not only provide full building ecosystem optimization but also help operators capitalize on the potential for energy savings via utility energy incentives and available demand management opportunities.

Consumption and Demand — The Difference

Understanding the difference between consumption and demand is essential for energy management planning. Consumption is measured in kilowatt hours (kWh) and refers to the amount of energy used during a billing period. Demand represents the instantaneous energy load that a commercial customer (or building) places on the grid. Utility providers use this for base infrastructure planning and to determine total load requirements of the electrical system. When demand increases, providers must draw from additional — and often more expensive — resources like coal and other fossil fuels.

Utilities measure demand in kilowatts (kW) based upon the actual power a consumer draws. Because demand costs can be potentially higher than consumption — with charges ranging from a few to several dollars per kW — demand can account for a significant portion of a monthly bill.

Evolving Demand Response

Due to the rise of renewable generation, utility providers across the country are rethinking how to develop and deploy demand response programs. Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in California conducted a study that evaluated the state’s energy dynamics. The study showed that California is benefiting from an increase in solar power and the continued shift of demand from midday to evening hours. The addition of smart thermostats and controls in commercial and residential sectors is also helping the state optimize energy consumption.

The LBNL study findings are helping researchers understand the amount of flexible customer load available and evaluate different methods for getting customers to change energy consumption habits, such as time of use, peak pricing programs, and day- and hour-ahead energy market plans.

The opportunity to shift demand is seen as the greatest contributor to future grid flexibility — and potentially one of the biggest opportunities for energy savings.

Energy Management Solutions

Today, advances in EMS software and controls platforms are helping operators connect with utilities and automate their energy management programs. Among other emerging strategies used by supermarket operators are self-generation via thermal and battery storage and grid-interactive buildings.

Self-generation via Thermal and Battery Storage

Most utility providers encourage consumers to implement proven thermal and battery storage options to help shift demand from peak to off-peak hours. The concept of self-generation is simple: thermal (ice) creation and battery charging take place during off-peak hours to store energy that can be used during peak hours to help utilities offset demand.

Grid-interactive Buildings

As IoT-enabled EMS and smart devices provide unprecedented connectivity between consumers and utility companies, opportunities for greater cooperation and energy optimization are also on the rise. At the Department of Energy (DOE), the Building Technology Office (BTO) is conducting research through its Grid-interactive Efficient Building (GEB) initiative. One of their primary goals is to enable buildings to become more responsive to the electric grid conditions.

These and other tools can help facilities improve energy efficiency and achieve operational success in a quickly evolving energy market. At Emerson, we’re helping to simplify energy management challenges with smart EMS software and proven controls platforms designed to help supermarket and restaurant operators connect with utilities and automate energy-saving best practices.

Multiplex Refrigeration Systems Can Help Meet Energy Regulations

MultiPlex_Diagram_HiRes

In the past, multiplex systems have struggled to gain momentum in the refrigeration industry, due to their higher initial cost. But with the Department of Energy tightening their regulations on minimum efficiency levels and concerns over refrigerant leakages increasing, the business case for these systems is quickly turning.

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MAKING SENSE of the Technology Used to Meet Future DOE Energy Regulations

MakingSense031715

Whether you’re an OEM, wholesaler, contractor, design consultant or end user, you’ve probably become increasingly aware of the of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) new minimum energy efficiency regulations in the commercial refrigeration industry. Although the effective dates for the DOE’s rulings are not until 2017 and 2018, many OEMs have proactively been preparing to improve the efficiency of their refrigeration equipment.

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