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Posts tagged ‘Food Safety’

How Data Loggers Streamline Food Safety Compliance

JulianHough_Blog_Image Julian Hough | Product Marketing Communication Specialist
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Imagine if you had enough money to put 8.5 million people through four years of private college at an average annual cost of $30k. The same amount would buy a Prius at its sticker price of $23,810 — for roughly 40 percent of American families. That’s what $1.6 trillion buys, and the combined amount that Americans spent in 2015 on food and beverages in grocery stores and dining out.1

Today’s tech-savvy millennials are acutely aware of the food they consume. When an outbreak of foodborne illness occurs, the subjects of food safety and consumer health immediately become top news stories. And CEOs are taking notice. In a 2017 interview, McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook stated, “Food safety is McDonald’s number one priority.”2

Food safety regulations and compliancy

In 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) implemented the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) under President Obama’s leadership; these laws were updated in 2016 to enforce best practices. Industry standards such as Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls (HARPC) and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) were designed to help food processors identify, control and prevent hazards through a systematic approach. HACCP compliance is currently mandatory for meat, poultry, seafood, dairy and juice processors in the United States, as well as retail food services. Because of its success in the food and meat industries, HACCP plans are also being applied to non-food industries.

Under the existing FSMA 2016 mandates, FDA-registered food facilities, manufacturing facilities and processors must:

  • Establish and maintain food safety systems that comply with HACCP/HARPC plans
  • Verify the controls are effective by monitoring, testing and taking corrective actions and documenting the outcomes
  • Maintain risk-based supply chain programs for raw materials and ingredients and provide education and training to employees

With the goal of proactively preventing foodborne illness outbreaks rather than reacting after the fact, FSMA laws helped established a positive path forward. The rise of wireless data-logging technologies has since been embraced by a spectrum of processing facilities — from meat and dairy processors to laboratories — to help maintain compliance.

Why do you need data loggers? 

Data loggers have becoming essential tools that facility managers can use to independently verify information in food retail and processing facilities. By identifying environmental factors that could affect product quality and invalidate food safety plans, data loggers help facility managers meet compliance standards, as well as monitor other key facility metrics, such as: energy conservation, recordkeeping in a cold storage facility, or air handler cycle frequencies.

Traditional methods used to monitor critical limits and maintain an accurate recordkeeping system come with drawbacks. Typically, these are strip chart recorder (with moving parts) or a thermometer that requires an employee to manually check and document conditions. It’s easy to see how these methods are inadequate and threaten the integrity of food safety plans. Alternatively, data loggers do not rely on mechanical, moving parts or constant manual attention from employees.

Temperature monitoring is especially critical for compliance with USDA and FDA regulations. Data loggers can be implemented into HACCP plans to easily achieve this goal. Since each HACCP plan is unique to each facility, the data logging solution is dependent upon an end user’s specific application requirements. This not only saves, time, energy and money, but it also helps facility managers comply with new regulations.

How do data loggers work?

Data loggers are electronic measurement instruments that record environmental parameters such as temperature, humidity, pressure, pH and much more. Data is retrieved through a wireless connection or downloaded directly to a PC. There, records of the data are generated in graphical and tabular formats and include date and time stamps to fulfill compliance requirements. These records can then be saved electronically or printed to provide to the appropriate regulatory agencies to prove a facility’s compliance.

Data loggers are a cost-effective means of extremely accurate data collection and recordkeeping over long periods of time and in extreme environments. To ensure data accuracy, most data-logging companies provide services to maintain the correct and consistent calibration of devices. A calibration certificate indicates the date and condition of the services, providing the documentation required by most regulatory agencies to prove proper periodic calibration.

Choosing a data logger provider

For more than 130 years, Cooper-Atkins has built a reputation as a trusted provider of environmental monitoring solutions. As a leading manufacturer in the field, Cooper-Atkins recently added state-of-the-art, data-logging technology to its stable of HACCP-compliant, wireless monitoring products.

According to Scott D’Aniello, vice president of industrial and food processing for Cooper-Atkins, there is no room for guesswork in the food supply chain.

“Good data is essential to controlling production and creating a consistently high-quality product,” he said.

Cooper-Atkins was awarded the prestigious “Global Supplier of the Year 2015” by McDonald’s.

“This recognition speaks volumes about who we are and how we can help facility managers. Today’s technological innovations are helping to ease the burden and keep food safe for consumers,” said D’Aniello.

Click here to learn more about Cooper-Atkins data loggers.

Top Five Reasons to Choose Copeland Scroll™

Phil Moeller | Vice President – Product Management, Refrigeration
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In an industry era defined by dynamic market forces and regulatory uncertainty, choosing a compression platform as the foundation for your refrigeration equipment is more critical than ever. As supermarket, restaurant and convenience store retailers face unprecedented changes in the way they conduct business, their refrigeration requirements are quickly evolving. Modern systems must meet a variety of emerging challenges, such as:

  • Supporting small- to large-store formats
  • Complying with food safety and environmental regulations
  • Adapting to e-commerce and omnichannel fulfillment requirements
  • Integrating with IoT technologies and building management systems
  • Achieving energy-efficiency and sustainability goals

Whether you’re an OEM updating your product lines, an end user evaluating compressors for new applications, or a technician performing system upgrades and retrofits, the Copeland Scroll compressor platform has the breadth of product lines to meet today’s demanding requirements.

Copeland Scroll has consistently pushed the envelope in refrigeration reliability for decades, and these innovations continue today. Here are the top five reasons leading equipment manufacturers, end users and contractors choose Copeland Scroll to support their refrigeration initiatives:

  1. Widest application and capacity range — When it comes to low- and medium-temperature applications in fractional to large-horsepower capacities from ¾ to 17 HP, only Copeland Scroll meets the full breadth of specifications for today’s diverse applications. In 2019, we’ll add three additional capacities to our popular KA lineup, which recently took home an Innovation Award at the 2018 AHR Expo.

 

  1. Technology leader — Since its introduction, Copeland Scroll has set the standard in compression technology. From digital modulation, liquid- and vapor-injection and low condensing operation to onboard electronic diagnostics and compatibility with low-GWP alternative and natural refrigerants, the Copeland Scroll platform continues to lead the industry in performance- enhancing innovations.

 

  1. Superior reliability and energy-efficiency At the end of the day, what matters most to our customers are reliable performance and energy-efficiency. With 70 percent fewer moving parts and a simple internal suction and discharge method, Copeland Scroll delivers reliable, energy- efficient performance, year after year. Its compact and lightweight design allows it to be integrated in applications where space is limited, without ever sacrificing performance or efficiency.

 

  1. Expert distribution network and support — As the standard in scroll compression technology, Copeland Scroll is backed by a wholesaler network comprised of 850 Copeland-authorized locations with more than 340 certified Copeland technical specialists on staff. And since Copeland Scroll is manufactured in the U.S., when you need customer service, product support or availability, representatives from our American base of operations can quickly deliver the compressor you need.

 

  1. Product development expertise — When you choose Copeland Scroll compressors, you’re also partnering with Emerson and gaining access to our extensive capabilities to support your product development efforts, including: application engineering; design, testing and certification services; innovation center proof-of-concepts; and app development.

 

From transport to cold storage, Copeland Scroll compressors are the first choice in every link of the food supply chain. So, don’t put your company’s reputation at risk. Choose the leader in scroll compression and commercial refrigeration technologies. Choose the proven dependability of Copeland Scroll.

 

Highlighting Smart Systems for National Food Safety Education Month

Ed_McKiernan Ed McKiernan | President, Cold Chain, Electronics & Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

September is National Food Safety Education Month. With food safety emerging as a top priority for retailers and store operators, we’re looking at how evolving technology and solutions are giving industry leaders opportunities to streamline their operations and ensure safety. To read the full article, which was featured in Convenience Store News, click here.

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Health-conscious lifestyles and food safety are top priorities for a growing number of consumers, forcing food retailers and producers to focus on implementing solutions and strategies that help ensure food is safe throughout its supply chain journey. Smart technology has evolved to help them automate critical tasks and meet increasingly stringent regulatory requirements.

Automated temperature monitoring and management capabilities are some of the best ways to maintain food safety from harvest and processing to transportation, post-processing, distribution and receiving. Since it’s Food Safety Education Month, we feel it’s an especially good time to highlight a few examples of food safety modernization.

Small trackers, big results

Rather than manually recording temperatures at load and unload or using analog sensors to detect out-of-range temperatures, leading growers are transitioning to using real-time trackers at the transportation level to determine optimal conditions for food freshness. These trackers are about the size of a deck of cards and monitor freshness throughout the entire food journey.

Maximize refrigerated shipping container lifespans

Because refrigerated shipping containers have both a high value and long-life expectations, maximizing their lifespans is crucial. By implementing remote monitoring systems for intermodal containers, shipping companies can detect problems with the compressor, system runtimes, interior temperature or lighting conditions and route the container for repair whenever needed. This same data can also be used to monitor perishable food conditions within the container.

Continuous temperature tracking

Food safety can be compromised, even after relatively short periods of temperature deviations. Now, temperature conditions can be recorded and monitored throughout the entire journey to a retail destination and, upon arrival, can connect automatically to Wi-Fi based systems for instant validation of safety.

Incorporating IoT

IoT and cloud-based solutions have emerged as necessary tools to maintaining food safety. These technologies enable data storage in the cloud and provide operators throughout the food supply chain with information to help maximize efficiency and ensure that perishable food is always kept safe.

Given the transparency that consumers are demanding about the food they’re eating, supply chain stakeholders are almost certain to make better use of automated and shared data by applying temperature management, data gathering and other IoT/cloud-based solutions across the entire food supply chain. Large retailers are also likely to embrace an interconnected approach to capturing data at every step to help drive consumer confidence.

This is an extremely dynamic period in cold chain history. As the industry moves to a more data-driven paradigm, we will undoubtedly discover improved methods of operation and new ways to engage and protect consumers. In recent years, Emerson has focused on expanding our capabilities across every domain within the cold chain to support this shift because we know the importance of providing data and information insights as food travels along its journey from farm to fork.

National Food Safety Education Month is a reminder of the importance of recognizing the efforts required to maintain food safety throughout the cold chain. Emerson focuses on these challenges every day: developing new technologies, strategies, solutions and products that not only help to optimize your operations, but also deliver the safest and freshest product possible.

 

Using Data to Fortify Food Safety

ronchapek_2 Ron Chapek | Director of Product Management/Enterprise Software

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Emerson’s ProAct™ food quality-report service grants convenience store owners and operators the opportunity to focus on customers’ needs and to build relationships without sacrificing food safety. For more information, watch the video in its entirety.

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For convenience store chains entering the foodservice business, their reputations are built upon their ability to deliver consistently fresh, high-quality, new food offerings. To accurately maintain this freshness and quality, store operators must have the capability to automate the monitoring and reporting of product case and food temperatures.

Formerly, operators would stake their quality and freshness reputations on unreliable and error-prone manual recording and tracking methods. Now, with the help of Emerson’s ProAct food quality-report service, food and case temperatures can be monitored automatically and easily rolled up into daily reports.

ProAct helps operators define the critical control points for their operation. In-case temperature sensors record the refrigerated case temperature data which is then converted into web-based reports that showcase hourly fixture temperatures, giving users the tools to help analyze and verify critical quality indicators easily and effectively.

The daily reports show hourly temperatures for cases, product probes and other monitoring points. Deviations from acceptable thresholds are highlighted in the report, along with defrost cycles and other key information. And since the food quality-report service eliminates the need for manual temperature monitoring, employees are free to focus their efforts on customer service and other aspects of the business that enable increased productivity.

Having access to these detailed reports gives operators the opportunity to manage tedious but critical details, to help ensure the health of their customers and to protect their reputation. ProAct food quality-report service is a positive addition to any food quality control system, including the internationally recognized HACCP methodology.

Pairing the food quality-report service with ProAct alarm management and setpoint management services helps ensure that retailers are maintaining food freshness and quality at every level and allows more focus to be placed on maintaining and developing customer relationships and other critical areas of the business.

National Food Safety Month: Helping You Keep Food Fresh From Farm to Fork

September is National Food Safety month so we thought this would be the perfect time to share with you some of our favorite industry articles and tips that will help you keep food fresh “from farm to fork”. Retailers are investing more in fresh foods to keep up with consumer demand, and keeping food safe is imperative.

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This podcast from the Food Management Institute discusses the Food Safety Modernization Act’s (FSMA) Sanitary Transportation rule and the key changes that it requires. You’ll learn how this rule impacts recordkeeping and documentation requirements for the transportation of food. This podcast helps retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers identify what procedures they’ll need to have in place in order to comply.

The Investor Responsibility Research Center (IRRC) did a study of highly publicized food scares in the global food chain that have occurred in recent years, such as the recent E.Coli and norovirus outbreaks at Chipotle. They examined these food safety events to identify the behavioral, regulatory and technological factors that have caused the food industry to become increasingly proactive in keeping food safe. This report covers the role of the FSMA in improving food safety, the globalization of the food supply chain and some of the technological innovations that have improved food safety.

Need detailed plans on how to set up a food safety program? This checklist from DEKRA Insight, a global safety consulting organization, can help. It covers building a team, developing policies, training, tracking and how to handle recalls and other issues that arise.

FoodLogicQ did a poll of 2,000 U.S. consumers to gauge their opinion on food traceability and expectations for companies on recalls and foodborne illness. Their report details the cost of food recalls not only in terms of dollars but in brand damage and lost sales. The survey shows that a majority of respondents want food companies to fully address recalls or illness within 1-2 days. Transparency in labeling, sourcing and having a plan to deal with problems will go a long way to growing and retaining your customers.

And no compilation of articles would be complete without a few of our own. Last year we did a series of articles on food safety for Food Safety month. In these articles, you’ll learn about the impact of FSMA, how to help prevent food safety issues with remote monitoring services, and best practices for transporting foods. To learn more about remote monitoring, read the article Emerson’s Ron Chapek wrote for Food Safety magazine. You’ll learn what options are available, and how remote monitoring minimized food loss expense for a large food retailer.

 

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