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Posts tagged ‘monitoring solutions’

[Webinar Recap] Explore the Next Generation in Supervisory Controls

Katrina Krites | Marketing and Business Development

Manager, Food Retail

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solutions Business

Building management and refrigeration control platforms have become essential tools of the trade in food retail operations. From providing visibility to key systems, faults, statuses, and alarms to fine-tuning performance with advanced algorithms, building control strategies and network connectivity, these platforms give operators and technicians the information they need to maintain efficient store operation. In a recent webinar, co-hosted with Sam Smith, Emerson’s director of product management for digital solutions, we explored the next-generation capabilities of Emerson’s new Lumity™ E3 supervisory control.

Unified control platform for E3 and site supervisor

Earlier this year, Emerson launched the Lumity brand with the goals of providing our customers with data-driven insights to inform operational decision making while helping them ensure food safety and quality. The E3 is among the first products to be launched under the Lumity umbrella. Built upon the foundation of the Lumity supervisory control software platform, the E3 shares the same software with site supervisor. Thus, end-users only need to learn one software platform. Any enhancements made to the software will be available in all available control devices and accessories.

Familiar form and fit with enhanced functionalities

The E3 was designed to provide a true drop-in hardware replacement of the E2, offering the same familiar form and fit, but with greatly enhanced functionalities. The back of the E3 enclosure is designed to fit into existing panels to eliminate the need for new wiring while reducing installation costs and headaches via:

  • Identical wiring holes, mounting points and vents
  • Fits into existing panel cut-out
  • Total of four COM ports for connected devices with two isolated COM ports
  • Fully backward compatible with MultiFlex and IONet boards

The front of the device features an integrated 10-inch, touch-screen display that provides on-site access to the software interface. Web-enabled capability supports online remote visibility from a web browser or mobile device, delivering the same user-friendly experience, regardless of how it is accessed. Compared to the E2, the E3 processing power is 12 times faster and includes 16 times the built-in memory for faster response time and increased storage capabilities. Several models are available, depending on the type of control needed:

  • Building control (BX)
  • Refrigeration control (RX)
  • Combined building and refrigeration controller (CX)

Whether operators prefer a distributed or centralized control architecture — or some combination of the two — the E3 has the built-in flexibility to communicate to upstream and downstream devices. Data integration protocols include: Rest MQTT and SOAP, which allows the E3 to serve as a gateway of communication throughout the network to deliver insights into every aspect of store operation.

Empowering decisions with insights

The E3 is designed to empower stakeholders of all disciplines and skill levels to take decisive actions through a variety of intuitive features. Store operators can manage day-to-day performance while technicians can take a much deeper dive to optimize system performance, perform detailed analyses, and fine-tune facility controls.

  • Floor Plans: Access 2D/3D views of store floor plans to monitor each device, locate active alarms, and streamline your team’s prioritization and response.
  • Graphical Scheduling: Easily update, set, and duplicate schedules via simple click-and-drag functionality and a graphical interface.
  • Smart Alarms: Review straightforward alarm notifications — not cryptic or confusing codes — to detect, prioritize, troubleshoot, and resolve issues.
  • Performance Meter: Monitor refrigeration asset performance from one dashboard to verify refrigeration fixtures and equipment are performing as expected.
  • Site Aggregator: Bring the entire control network into a consolidated view — includes connectivity to legacy Emerson devices (such as E2 controllers) as well as third-party devices.

To learn how you can leverage the power of the new Lumity E3 supervisory control and software platform in your facility, view this free webinar.

How Restaurants and C-stores Can Deliver Safe, High-quality Food Offerings

MattToone_2 Matt Toone | Vice President, Sales & Solutions – Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Whether you’re a convenience store (c-store) operator, quick-service restaurant (QSR), or a fast casual or fine dining establishment, ensuring food quality and safety is imperative to your success. In this blog, the first of a three-part series based on a recent E360 article, Minimizing Food Safety Risks From Farm to Fork, I’ll explore the efforts involved in maintaining safety throughout the food supply chain.

How Restaurants and C-stores Can Deliver Safe, High-quality Food Offerings

Dining out has become an everyday part of American life. It’s estimated that more than one-third of us eat at a fast-food restaurant every day, and more than 60 percent have dinner at a restaurant at least once a week. As consumers are becoming increasingly discriminating about what they eat, restaurants are under more pressure to deliver fresh, healthy foods and in greater varieties. But, above all else, restaurant operators must ensure food is safe to eat.

Food’s journey to a customer’s plate (or a packaged take-out container) is fraught with hazards. Ensuring food safety is a cumulative effort shared by every stakeholder along the journey — from production and processing to transportation, cold storage and ultimately, the foodservice provider. Temperature deviations, unsafe handling practices and improper food preparation processes can all increase the potential for foodborne illness outbreaks.

Thankfully, improvements in refrigeration equipment and internet of things (IoT) technologies are helping to provide more reliable and consistent temperature and quality control within the cold chain. Throughout food’s journey, operators at each point are now able to monitor, control and track a variety of conditions necessary for preserving food quality, including: temperature, humidity, the presence of ripening agents, lighting and much more.

Meeting customer expectations

Modern restaurants and c-stores are being held to increasingly higher food safety and quality standards. Consumers and regulators alike are demanding greater transparency in the food supply chain, which includes improved traceability of food’s journey from farm to fork. To keep customers coming back, operators must not only consistently deliver safe, high-quality food but also openly disclose their suppliers.

Protecting against foodborne illness outbreaks helps to not only ensure your customers’ well-being, it also guards against potentially devastating impacts to your brand’s reputation and bottom-line profitability. As one of the final links in the food supply chain, restaurant operators must ensure that food is safe on receipt and adhere to safe food storage, handling and preparation processes in their kitchens.

This starts with understanding everything that contributes to food quality and safety throughout the cold chain. With today’s connected infrastructures and IoT-based monitoring and tracking capabilities, operators now have the potential for visibility into each step of the journey — even the possibility for comprehensive cold chain traceability. Then, once food has been received into inventory, this process continues by applying all the modern tools available to ensure food quality, safety and consistency.

Food supply chain safety is cumulative

It’s estimated that nearly half of the fresh fruit and one-third of the fresh vegetables consumed in the United States are sourced from foreign countries — transported by land, sea and air in a process that can span the point of harvest, processing, cold storage and distribution. Overseas shipments can last anywhere from two to four weeks; for domestic transportation, it can take three to four days to ship strawberries from California to the East Coast.

In total, these perishables can potentially undergo as many as 20 to 30 steps and multiple changes of ownership throughout the food supply chain process. The more these items change hands, or are staged, loaded and unloaded, the greater the chances for contamination and temperature excursions along the way.

In my next blog, I’ll take a closer look at the environmental factors and conditions putting food at risk as well as the food safety regulatory landscape.

 

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