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Posts tagged ‘refrigerants’

[New Webinar] Spotlight on Emerging CO2 Refrigeration Technologies

Andre Patenaude | Director – Solutions Strategy

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solution’s Business

Emerson is pleased to announce our participation in the ATMO World Summit 2022 on March 30–31, when industry stakeholders will assemble virtually around the globe to discuss the future of cooling and heating technologies. This free, 24-hour event will feature a webinar at the top of every hour. At 3 p.m. EDT (12 p.m. PST) on March 30, Emerson’s Andre Patenaude, director of solutions strategy, and Emily Vilardi, product marketing manager, will explore how emerging natural refrigerant technologies are poised to deliver the next generation of refrigeration.

Today, corporate sustainability initiatives and refrigerant regulations are driving the increased adoption of natural refrigerants, such as CO2 (R-744), propane (R-290) and ammonia (R-717). Approved for use across a broad range of commercial refrigeration applications, these multipurpose refrigerants are among the lowest-global warming potential (GWP) alternatives available.

For more than a decade, Emerson has been developing natural refrigerant technologies to help support the transition away from high-GWP hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Our ATMO World Summit 2022 webinar — “Spotlight on Emerging CO2 Refrigeration Technologies” — will demonstrate how Emerson is simplifying the adoption of CO2 transcritical booster refrigeration via the seamless integration of key system components and technologies.

In addition to hearing the latest trends related to natural refrigerant adoption, attendees will learn about Emerson’s commitment to developing technologies that further CO2 refrigeration in the U.S. via:

  • Introducing electronic controls that simplify CO2 installation and system operation
  • Expanding our CO2 compressor lineup and system components
  • Increasing lab investments to create the next generation of natural refrigerant technologies
  • Releasing our next-generation CO2 mobile training unit to help fill the industry-wide training gapReleasing our next-generation CO2 mobile training unit to help fill the industry-wide training gap

Introducing Lumity™ E3 supervisory control for CO2

Among our many natural refrigerant-related product advancements, we’ll highlight how our new Lumity E3 supervisory control for CO2 reduces system start-up complexities, consolidates multiple functions into one easy-to-use interface, supports mobile connectivity for remote troubleshooting, and integrates with our new Lumity CC200 case controller for full system optimization.

Our webinar on March 30 is just one of 24 sessions that will be presented at the full-day ATMO World Summit 2022. Be sure to check the program’s schedule for other topics that may interest you. Registration for this free online event is now open and will be hosted by the Zoom Events platform.

To learn more about how Emerson is helping the commercial refrigeration industry adopt CO2 system technologies, register for this free webinar.

 

 

 

Sustainable Refrigeration Solutions on Display at AHR Expo

Diego Marafon | Refrigeration Scroll Product Manager

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solutions Business

Emerson is pleased to announce our participation in the upcoming AHR Expo at the Las Vegas Convention Center on Jan. 31–Feb. 2. We will be exhibiting in booth C3106 in the Central Hall, where our latest advancements in sustainable refrigeration technologies and solutions for CO2, R-290 and A2L refrigerants will be on display.

As the commercial refrigeration industry continues the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP), CO2 (or refrigerant R-744), R-290 (or propane) and A2L refrigerants are poised to play ever-expanding roles. Over the next several years, food retailers will face new regulatory compliance challenges that will impact their refrigeration system choices. At the same time, many have stated corporate sustainability objectives that are driving them toward the implementation of more environmentally friendly refrigeration technologies.

For retailers considering sustainable refrigeration strategies, Emerson is committed to helping them make this transition as easily as possible. At AHR Expo, we will be highlighting some of the latest developments for each of these refrigerant categories.

CO2 with confidence

Our comprehensive approach to CO2 refrigeration systems focuses on the seamless integration of compression controls, valves and related components. Our knowledgeable CO2 specialists will be on hand to lend their expertise, consult with you about your refrigeration goals, and advise you on how to:

  • Transition to low-GWP CO2 refrigeration with confidence
  • Simplify CO2 system complexities with advanced controls
  • Deploy CO2 in various climate zones throughout the country

Among the complete CO2 solutions on display will include:

  • Copeland™ 4MTLS transcritical CO2 semi-hermetic compressor
  • Copeland ZOD subcritical CO2 scroll compressor
  • Lumity™ E3 supervisory control for CO2 applications
  • Vilter™ HPLD single screw compressor
  • Copeland variable frequency drives (VFDs), EVM series
  • Emerson valves and controls
    • CV (120 bar [EEV])
    • CS3 (120 bar [pressure switch])
    • OMC
  • Lumity CC200 case control

Visit our booth to learn how each of these components is designed to maximize CO2 system performance and simplify installation, commissioning and operation throughout the lifecycle.

R-290 ready

Our booth will also allow you to explore new opportunities for efficient, low-GWP R-290 refrigeration in self-contained units. Recent increases in charge limits have set the stage for wider R-290 adoption and the potential for larger capacities. We will demonstrate how Emerson is focused on reducing energy consumption through our fixed and variable speed R-290 compression technologies. Our AHR Expo product portfolio will include:

  • Copeland™ horizontal variable speed scroll condensing unit (AHR Expo Innovation Awards Finalist)
  • Copeland VFDs, EVM series
  • Copeland ZB*KAU fixed speed scroll
  • Copeland variable speed hermetic reciprocating compressor and drive
  • Copeland fixed speed hermetic reciprocating compressors
  • Copeland M-Line condensing units
  • 100RB Series solenoid valve
  • Copper spun filter drier
  • PS4 pressure switch
  • BVS ball valve
  • Dixell™ XRi Series variable speed controls

Exploring the potential of A2Ls

For those interested in emerging A2L refrigerants, we will explore the potential for higher charge limits and how their broad applicability will provide additional refrigerant alternatives in the near future. We will demonstrate how we’re developing low-GWP A2L solutions designed to help retailers meet strict regulatory standards by:

  • Enabling higher charges than R-290 in self-contained equipment
  • Supporting remote condensing unit refrigeration in retail applications
  • Qualifying A2Ls in reliable and efficient Copeland scroll compressor platforms

So if you’re planning on attending AHR Expo, be sure to visit booth C3106 in the Central Hall. We look forward to meeting you and exploring how we can help you to meet your sustainability goals.

Refrigerant Strategies for Achieving Regulatory Compliance

Andre Patenaude | Director – Solutions Integration,

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solution’s Business

Choosing a refrigerant is one of the most important decisions facing food retailers today. With regulatory mandates set to take effect soon, questions about refrigerants and equipment strategies continue to dominate industry conversations. In a recent article that appeared in Contracting Business, I offered tips for achieving regulatory compliance using a variety of lower-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. You can also view our formatted article here.

After years of regulatory uncertainty, supermarket owners and operators have developed varying degrees of refrigerant transition fatigue. But with the passing of the American Innovation and Manufacturing (AIM) Act in late 2020, regulatory compliance is again becoming a top priority. The AIM Act brings hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) regulations back into focus at a national level and proposes a significant phasedown of HFC refrigerants over the next five years.

Because compliance will no longer be a concern only for those located within California and U.S. Climate Alliance states, many operators are evaluating their retrofit and replacement options for the first time. But it’s important to understand that there is no one-size-fits-all strategy. In addition to regulatory compliance, operators must consider other key decision criteria, including operational safety, reliable system performance, the total cost of ownership (TCO) and their own corporate sustainability objectives.

At one end of the continuum, some are pursuing a one-time investment that can get them to the end game of compliance. Others may prefer to take a more incremental approach, i.e., focusing on a strategy that meets near-term compliance targets but is also capable of adapting to future standards. No matter how far along your company is on its sustainability journey — or how much progress (or lack thereof) you’ve made on your refrigerant transition — there are a wide variety of options from which to choose.

Retrofit to R-448A/R-449A in existing centralized direct expansion (DX) systems

For operators hoping to preserve their existing investments, replacing R-404A with R-448A will allow them to achieve sustainability improvements with minimal retrofit requirements. R-448A’s slightly higher discharge temperatures require additional compressor cooling, such as: head cooling fans and/or demand cooling modules or the installation of a vapor-injected scroll compressor. While this strategy may be viable for lowering carbon emissions, it may not satisfy future low-GWP regulatory requirements.

Move the condensing unit outdoors

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) that utilize R-448A are designed to deliver lower-GWP refrigeration by servicing a limited number of medium- (MT) or low-temperature (LT) fixtures. Ideal for small, urban store formats or large supermarkets deploying new refrigeration capabilities outside of their existing DX systems, OCUs offer installation flexibility and reliability in a variety of scenarios. As A2L refrigerants become available for use in the future, this distributed OCU approach will enable even lower-GWP refrigeration.

Distribute scroll racks throughout the supermarket

Scroll racks provide a scaled-down, distributed version of a conventional rack system that can be strategically installed in proximity to different refrigerated sections. This allows retailers to significantly reduce their overall refrigerant charge — today with R-448A and potentially A2Ls in the future — while benefiting from increased system reliability and energy efficiency. In Europe, A2L versions of these systems have already been successfully trialed and deployed.

Deploy micro-distributed (self-contained) units

Ideal for retrofits, remodels and spot merchandising, flexible stand-alone (aka self-contained) units are factory-charged with R-290 and a 150g charge limit. With the recent Underwriters Laboratories (UL) approval of potentially larger R-290 and A2L charges, this micro-distributed approach will support even greater system capacity in the future. They also utilize lower-GWP HFCs. Manufacturers are designing larger self-contained cases that can integrate a single compressor, refrigeration circuit and electronic controls within the unit itself. This approach can then be scaled from one to multiple units with all cases connected to a shared water loop to remove heat from the store.

Simplify with a distributed scroll booster

Another emerging distributed approach utilizes the low-pressure, lower-GWP R-513A for LT and MT circuits in a scroll booster architecture. This system is designed to eliminate the high discharge temperatures and compression ratios typically found in LT systems. Today, distributed scroll booster systems deliver improved energy efficiencies and high reliability within a familiar A1 operating envelope. This architecture also provides future-state regulatory assurance by offering compatibility with very low-GWP A2Ls.

Boost compliance with CO2 (centralized)

CO2 transcritical booster systems offer an environmentally friendly alternative to HFC-based centralized DX systems. Utilizing R-744 for LT and MT loads, this proven architecture allows operators to achieve compliance with regulations for the foreseeable future. However, the refrigerant’s high-pressure and unique performance characteristics increase system complexities and require the assistance of CO2-trained technicians. This system strategy is already widely adopted globally and is becoming more popular among U.S. retailers suffering from refrigerant transition fatigue.

At Emerson, we are developing refrigeration technologies to help industry stakeholders meet their current and future regulatory mandates. Not only can we help you successfully deploy any of the strategies discussed in this blog, but we’re also ready to help you make the transition to a low-GWP refrigeration strategy that aligns with your operational and sustainability objectives.

Selecting Condensing Units for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers

         Don Gillis | Lead Technical Trainer

          Emerson’s Educational Services

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have become essential for providing remote refrigeration in the walk-in coolers and freezers (WICFs) used by food retailers, foodservice operators, cold storage facilities and processing plants. As OCU technologies and end-user preferences continue to evolve, contractors need to understand many considerations when selecting an optimal OCU for their specific application and operational requirements. In a recent E360 article, we evaluated key selection criteria and explored today’s leading OCU options.

Sustainability goals, refrigerant regulations and efficiency standards

To help operators comply with environmental regulations and meet their sustainability initiatives, OCU equipment manufacturers are integrating lower-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that contractors and end-users will need to adapt to completely new servicing and operating procedures. Many OCUs are designed to use a newer generation of lower-GWP A1 hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants — such as R-448A and R-449A — which represent minimal changes in terms of safety protocols or servicing.

But since these lower-GWP A1 refrigerants have degrees of glide, contractors need to be aware of how the sizing and selection process may be impacted. Refrigerants with glide may have a diminishing impact upon system capacity, which might require you to select a slightly larger-horsepower OCU — and unit cooler/evaporator — to meet your refrigeration load requirements.

As safety standards and building codes evolve over the next few years, mildly flammable A2Ls will likely be added to the list of refrigerant alternatives used in OCUs. Today, Emerson is actively qualifying our OCUs for use with A2Ls and will be ready to support operators seeking even lower-GWP A2L options when they are approved.

When it comes to OCU use in WICFs, refrigerants are only part of the sustainability equation. Per the Department of Energy’s (DOE) 2020 rule, WICFs must meet 20–40 percent energy reductions on new and retrofit systems below 3,000 square feet. To calculate the energy efficiency of a complete WICF system, the DOE uses a metric created by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) called the Annual Walk-In Energy Factor (AWEF).

If you are a contractor installing a condensing unit and/or unit cooler, you must ensure this equipment meets or exceeds the minimum AWEF ratings based on capacity and application — such as medium- (MT) or low-temperature (LT); indoor or outdoor; and refrigerant type. To comply with the DOE standard, simply combine a Copeland™ AWEF-rated condensing unit with an AWEF-rated unit cooler.

Copeland outdoor refrigeration units

Copeland outdoor refrigeration units are designed to comply with regulations and provide sustainable refrigeration for a wide variety of modern operator requirements. Combining the reliable efficiency of Copeland scroll compressor technology with variable speed fans, large condenser coils and smart electronic controls, Copeland X-Line Series outdoor refrigeration units provide whisper-quiet performance in compact enclosures, delivering maximum installation flexibility.

Copeland outdoor refrigeration unit, X-Line Series — available in a horsepower range from ¾ to 6 HP, the X-Line is designed for LT and MT applications, such as WICFs and display cases commonly found in convenience stores (c-stores), restaurants, supermarkets and cold storage facilities. It delivers best-in-class energy efficiencies, a slim profile, ultra-low sound levels, superior diagnostics and built-in compressor protection. Offering AWEF-rated efficiencies and lower-GWP (R-448A and R-449A) refrigerant options, the X-Line supports reliable refrigeration while solving many of today’s operational challenges.

Copeland digital outdoor refrigeration unit, X-Line Series — The digital X-Line Series builds upon the field-proven Copeland scroll and X-Line OCU platforms to deliver superior cooling and energy efficiency in MT applications. Providing variable-speed fan motor control, the digital X-Line Series enables variable-capacity modulation to deliver more precise, reliable refrigeration, longer-lasting equipment and lower energy bills. Available in 3, 4, 5 and 6 HP models, the digital X-Line Series also supports multiplex refrigeration architectures — where one OCU provides cooling for multiple fixtures — to meet a variety of modern refrigeration challenges:

  • Reducing the number of refrigeration fixtures and/or refrigeration loads
  • Precisely sizing refrigeration units and loads to an application
  • Eliminating compressor cycling, which negatively affects system performance and equipment longevity
  • Improving food quality and extending shelf life via tighter temperature control
  • Removing constraints that prevent the installation of multiple fixed-capacity OCUs

Calculate the capacity of your OCU

At Emerson, we are committed to helping contractors calculate refrigeration loads and select OCUs to meet a diverse range of LT and MT refrigeration requirements. By selecting the correct OCUs for your customers’ WICF applications, you can ensure reliable, efficient system performance throughout their lifecycles. To simplify this process, Emerson has created a free online Box Load Calculator tool to assist manufacturers and operators to select, purchase and identify the appropriate equipment for their application. Simply navigate to the Equipment Selection tab, enter your application parameters and estimated refrigeration load, and review your optimal equipment options as you evaluate your specific refrigeration requirements.

Refer to Emerson’s Box Load Calculator to help select a condensing unit for your application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refrigeration Basics: Understanding Refrigerants With Glide

         Don Gillis | Lead Technical Trainer

          Emerson’s Educational Services

Welcome to our new series of blogs intended to help not just beginning service technicians, but anyone who wants to learn more about the basics of refrigeration. I plan to share insights, best practices and other information from our Emerson training program as well as from our commercial and residential solutions experts. In addition, we’ve created companion videos about each topic that you can cross-reference while accessing other related information at Education.Emerson.com.

In this series, I’ll touch on topics ranging from how condensers, compressors and evaporators work, to superheating and subcooling, to the refrigeration cycle, vapor injection and basic refrigeration system troubleshooting. In this blog, I explain the key environmental considerations of refrigerants, how to account for refrigerant glide, and how the dew point impacts climate control equipment performance.

What’s the difference between ODP and GWP?

A refrigerant’s environmental characteristics are determined largely by two factors: 1) its impact on the Earth’s ozone layer, or ozone depletion potential (ODP); and 2) its potential to produce greenhouse gas emissions, or global warming potential (GWP). Chlorine-containing ODP refrigerants have been banned for use, while high-GWP hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants are currently the target of global regulations (i.e., the HFC phasedown). Today, refrigerant manufacturers are introducing a variety of lower-GWP refrigerant alternatives to help commercial and residential customers achieve a full spectrum of sustainability goals.

In the United States, federal and state regulations are accelerating the phasedown of the use of high-GWP refrigerants. Meanwhile, corporate sustainability objectives also are driving more companies to re-evaluate their choices of refrigerants and refrigeration systems.

What is refrigerant glide?

Refrigerants are often comprised of a blend of two or more constituents. These individual components’ different saturation temperatures can impact the refrigerant’s performance characteristics. Working with refrigerants with glide requires understanding the boiling point of each of its constituents:

  • Bubble point, or lowest condensing temperature of a constituent
  • Mean condensing temperature
  • Dew point, or the highest condensing temperature of a constituent

The difference between the boiling points of the first and last constituents is referred to as glide. Essentially, the least volatile component condenses first, and each additional component of a refrigerant blend will start and end at different boiling points. The total temperature glide of a refrigerant blend is defined as the temperature difference between the saturated vapor temperature and the saturated liquid temperature at a constant pressure. An alternate definition is the temperature difference between the starting and ending temperatures of a refrigerant phase change within a system at a constant pressure.

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