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Posts tagged ‘Refrigeration’

[Webinar Recap] Digital X-Line Enhances Proven Condensing Unit Platform

Julie Havenar | Product Manager – Condensing Units
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

For decades, fixed-capacity outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have been a popular architecture choice for foodservice and food retail applications — providing refrigeration for walk-in coolers, display cases and food preparation tables. With recent advances in digital compression technology to enable variable-capacity modulation, modern condensing units offer an even more compelling alternative to traditional centralized architectures. In our recent webinar, I discussed the many benefits of taking a decentralized approach to refrigeration, specifically by using Emerson’s Copeland™ Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line series.

[Webinar Recap] Digital X-Line Enhances Proven Condensing Unit Platform

First, it’s important to review the many reasons why fixed-capacity condensing units have experienced wide industry adoption. Their simple architecture — with one dedicated condensing unit per evaporator (or refrigeration fixture) — makes them extremely easy to implement and a flexible option for load expansion or facility retrofits. By locating the condensing units outside the store, this approach also removes heat and mechanical sound from the shopping environment. In addition, their air-cooled design removes the need for water loops while eliminating excess cost and unit cooling.

But there is always room for improvement. So, we reached out to our customer base to gather feedback about their pain points when using these fixed-capacity OCUs. Common challenges included: the use of mechanical controls; lack of remote communications, onboard diagnostics and system protections; limited mounting/installation options; single speed (on/off) fan cycling; single unit required for every load with each unit individually wired.

Overcoming these challenges became the basis of our Copeland™ Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line series launched a few years ago. X-Line offered the following improvements:

  • Slim, lightweight profile — can be wall-mounted or mounted on rails
  • Quiet — can be located near entrances, patios or residential areas
  • Energy efficient — Copeland scroll compression, variable-speed fan motor control, large condenser coils and enhanced vapor injection (on low-temp, fixed-speed only)
  • Connectivity — communicates with facility management systems, such as Emerson’s XWEB, Site Supervisor and E2 platforms
  • Protection — electronic controls enhance reliability; on-board diagnostics enable fast setup, troubleshooting and alert codes
  • AWEF-compliant — meeting DOE (Department of Energy) regulations

Digital modulation addresses additional customer challenges

With the introduction of the digital X-Line, Emerson was able to address another key customer challenge — requiring a separate condensing unit for each refrigeration load — while enabling variable-capacity modulation from 100% to 20%. The digital X-Line utilizes multiplexing technology to connect multiple fixtures to one condensing unit and detects the required refrigeration demand from each fixture. So, if the digital X-Line were servicing multiple evaporators and only one was calling for cooling, the digital X-Line can run at less than 100% capacity and match the exact load capacity requirement at that moment. This means that operators will need fewer condensing units to meet their refrigeration demands — potentially reducing the equipment footprint.

Other installation benefits include:

  • Simple and quick commissioning — requires only three setpoints: refrigerant, time clock and suction pressure
  • Reduced refrigerant charge and line sets — up to 50% reduction with the option to utilize lower-GWP alternatives
  • Reduced costly call-backs — advanced diagnostics help contractors set it up right the first time

From an operational standpoint, the digital X-Line is designed to deliver continuous performance improvements that impact food quality/safety, energy efficiency and servicing, such as:

  • Tight temperature precision — digital, variable-capacity modulation enables precise control over case temperatures to maximize food quality and safety
  • Energy efficiency gains — larger condenser coils, electronic controls and digital compression (which reduce large amp draws from excessive starts/stop) deliver substantial energy efficiency savings
  • Advanced diagnostics and protection — onboard controls alert end users of faults and KPIs, simplify troubleshooting and provide compressor protection

It’s also important to point out that the digital X-Line maintains the platform’s ultra-quiet operation, which allows the units to be installed nearly anywhere without disrupting customers or neighbors.

Whether you operate a convenience store, restaurant, supermarket or cold storage facility, the digital X-Line provides operators with a state-of-the-art OCU solution that’s ideal for meeting today’s challenging refrigeration requirements. To learn more about the benefits of the digital X-Line in these applications, view this webinar in its entirety.

[New Webinar] Will Explore the Advantages of Digital Outdoor Refrigeration

Julie Havenar | Product Manager – Condensing Units
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have been a mainstay for small refrigeration applications for decades. In an upcoming webinar, we will review recent OCU technology innovations that utilize digital compressors to achieve the many benefits of variable-capacity modulation. This informative webinar will take place on Tuesday, June 9 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT.

New Webinar

Commonly used by small-format grocers, convenience stores and restaurants, OCUs have traditionally provided refrigeration for walk-in coolers, display cases and food preparation rooms. By equipping this proven refrigeration strategy with digital compressors, OCUs can provide a greatly expanded role in refrigeration applications. We will explore these new possibilities by taking a closer look at Emerson’s Copeland Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series.

Instead of providing one refrigeration load per unit, the digital X-Line allows operators to service multiple refrigeration loads with one unit — potentially eliminating the need for multiple condensing units. In addition, their ability to modulate capacity per refrigerated load requirements enables precise temperature control and load matching for maximum energy efficiencies.

Webinar attendees will learn how the digital X-Line delivers major advancements to outdoor refrigeration:

  • Fewer units to install and maintain
  • Tight temperature precision
  • Simple and quick commissioning
  • Lightweight and flexible installation options
  • Reduced costly call-backs via advanced diagnostics
  • Lowered refrigerant charge and line sets

Unlike traditional OCUs that utilize a fixed-capacity compressor, the digital X-Line enables continuous capacity modulation from 20 to 100 percent to deliver significant reductions in energy consumption and refrigeration improvements. This advanced compression technology — combined with variable-speed fan motor control, large-capacity condenser coils, and smart protection and diagnostics — provides operators with a state-of-the-art OCU solution that’s ideal for meeting today’s challenging refrigeration requirements.

To learn more about the benefits of variable-capacity modulation in OCUs, register now for this free webinar.

Upgrade Compressors to Extend Commercial Refrigeration System Lifespan

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

ACHR News recently interviewed me for an article titled “Compressor Retrofits on the Rise in Commercial Refrigeration.” It featured a variety of perspectives on the merits of compressor retrofits versus total system replacement. The article can be found here.

When facility energy costs creep up, one of the first suspects is almost always the commercial refrigeration system. It’s a reasonable assumption to make. Over time, it’s very common for energy efficiency to decline as systems drift from their original commissioned performance baselines.

But that doesn’t make a total system replacement inevitable. Many food retailers are reclaiming energy efficiencies by pairing system recommissioning with a measurement and verification (M&V) program and targeted compressor upgrades. In the process, they can reduce energy consumption, improve system performance and reliability and extend the system’s lifespan without the capital investment and business interruption that a full system replacement would require.

Back to the (factory spec) basics

Prolonged use, normal wear and tear and migration from recommended setpoints can degrade efficiency over time. Recommissioning fine-tunes the refrigeration system so that it operates as intended. The process typically involves optimizing every setpoint, cleaning condensers and replacing damaged components. Often, operators can capture significant savings just by recalibrating their system to factory specifications.

Implementing an M&V program ensures those savings are sustainable. Energy-monitoring equipment that delivers real-time insights will help operators ensure their equipment stays in tune. When variances occur, contractors can quickly identify the root cause and address the issue. But just as important, they can use the data generated by the M&V program to make informed decisions on future improvements.

Greater efficiency through variable-capacity modulation

The next step is to enhance energy efficiencies in low- and medium-temperature racks by upgrading to a digital compressor with variable-capacity modulation or by adding a variable frequency drive (VFD). Often, the best candidates for replacement are fixed-capacity compressors that are underperforming or the smallest displacement compressors in each rack.

By adding a variable-capacity digital compressor or VFD to the mix, operators can:

  • Accurately match capacity to changing refrigeration loads
  • Improve case temperature precision
  • Reduce compressor cycling
  • Maintain tighter control over suction manifold pressures

One often overlooked solution is the option to add a VFD to legacy Copeland™ Discus and Copeland™ Scroll fixed-capacity compressors. Perhaps a more common solution is replacing one or even two underperforming fixed-capacity compressors with a digital compressor such as a Copeland Discus Digital or Copeland Scroll Digital compressor — both of which enable variable-capacity modulation to deliver significant energy savings.

When a leading supermarket chain tested the strategy on a 20-year-old, 45,000 square foot grocery store in Ontario, it found that:

  • Recommissioning reduced energy costs by 18%
  • Replacing two weaker units with Copeland Discus compressors reduced energy costs by an additional 16% and qualified the retailer for a local energy incentive program

The entire effort delivered an annual energy savings of more than $40,000.

Proven strategies for every situation

As other contributors to the article note, compressor upgrades (or retrofits) may not always be the right solution for every system. Depending on the age and condition of the equipment, a total system replacement may make more financial sense. This strategy would ensure all system controls and components are integrated and optimized for lower-GWP refrigerants.

Ultimately, choosing between a compressor retrofit or full system replacement should be a data-driven decision that operators make in consultation with their contractors. As a leader in commercial refrigeration and other cold chain technologies, Emerson can help operators maximize their return on that decision. We offer a full suite of components that boost energy efficiency and provide internet of things (IoT) capabilities for retrofits and new equipment alike. Our application engineers are available to answer questions related to refrigeration system performance, retrofit opportunities and strategies for maximizing energy efficiency.

[New E360 Webinar] Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

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Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

 

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

5 Earth Day Steps to Greener Refrigeration

RajanRajendran2 Rajan Rajendran | V.P., System Innovation Center and Sustainability

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Every year on April 22, nations around the globe pause to recognize Earth Day and reflect on the importance of preserving the planet’s environment. This year will mark the 50th anniversary of the annual Earth Day commemoration; its theme is “climate action”. According to the organization’s website, “Climate change represents the biggest challenge to the future of humanity and the life-support systems that make our world inhabitable.” Thus, action is essential for mitigating the damaging impacts of climate change.

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For decades, the commercial refrigeration industry has taken a global focus on climate action. In 1987, the Montreal Protocol set out to ban the use of refrigerants with ozone depletion potential (ODP) — and as of today, these efforts have proved extremely effective. But in 2020, our industry has a new environmental mandate: to phase down the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants with high global warming potential (GWP). The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol was enacted to do just that; since 2019, 20 countries are participating in these measures. At the same time, other countries have adopted their own HFC phase-down regulations, and states like California are leading the charge here in the United States.

But while the environmental focus is often on refrigerants, it’s important to understand that refrigeration must be evaluated from its total equivalent warming impact (TEWI), which considers both the impacts of refrigerants and the energy efficiency of a system throughout the lifecycle. For decades, Emerson has been committed to promoting sustainable and environmentally friendly refrigeration. Here are five best practices that we promote to achieve greener refrigeration strategies.

  1. Recommission your refrigeration system. Over time, refrigeration systems can drift steadily from their original commissioned performance baselines. It’s important to make sure systems are operating as efficiently as possible before considering any upgrades such as replacing a compressor. Recommissioning returns the system back to its original operating parameters and establishes a necessary baseline from which ongoing improvements can be made.
  2. Implement an energy measurement and verification (M&V) program. The decision to upgrade or replace a compressor must be evaluated from a holistic assessment of the refrigeration system. To gain deeper insights into system performance, we recommend implementing a formal measurement and verification program in tandem with the recommissioning process. An M&V program helps to identify holistic system energy-efficiency data and evaluate individual compressor performance, which operators can use to potentially qualify for an energy incentive program. Participating utilities may offer rebates for replacing inefficient equipment with newer, energy-efficient models.
  3. Retrofit to variable-capacity modulation. After identifying the low- and medium-temperature compressors that are underperforming, the next step would be to upgrade them to enable a variable-capacity compression strategy — either by upgrading to a digitally modulated compressor or adding a variable frequency drive (VFD). Replacing even one fixed-capacity compressor with a variable-capacity digital compressor can result in significant benefits, such as: improved energy efficiencies, precise matching of capacity to changing refrigeration loads, improved case temperature precision, reduced compressor cycling (on/off), and tight control over suction manifold pressures.
  4. Enable low-condensing operation. One often overlooked strategy — which is also factoring into some environmental regulations — is the practice of low-condensing operation (aka floating the head pressure). Instead of operating at a high fixed head pressure regardless of the ambient temperature, low-condensing operation floats the head pressure down as the ambient temperature drops — in the evening, overnight and early morning hours. This best practice utilizes electronic expansion valves (EEVs) that allow for dynamic control so that the system is no longer operating at maximum capacity during periods of cooler ambient temperatures. As a result, compressor capacity increases while wattage consumed decreases. In fact, operators can realize lower costs through energy efficiency ratio (EER) improvements of 15–20% for every 10 °F decrease in head pressure.
  5. Transition to lower-GWP refrigerants. Preparing for the future of refrigeration means transitioning from higher-GWP HFC refrigerants to lower-GWP alternatives. Of course, doing so will require adopting new refrigeration technologies and system architectures. From self-contained, integrated cases which utilize natural, hydrocarbon refrigerants to proven CO2 transcritical booster systems and new distributed micro-booster systems that use lower-GWP refrigerants with familiar operating properties, there are a wide variety of emerging systems capable of addressing the full range of commercial refrigeration applications.

Emerson is committed to developing innovative refrigeration technologies and helping commercial refrigeration stakeholders adopt more sustainable refrigeration strategies. We’re actively developing solutions that address all the best practices listed above, and we’re working to promote future refrigeration technologies that will help our customers meet their unique sustainability goals.

 

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