Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Supermarkets’

Selecting Condensing Units for Walk-in Coolers and Freezers

         Don Gillis | Lead Technical Trainer

          Emerson’s Educational Services

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have become essential for providing remote refrigeration in the walk-in coolers and freezers (WICFs) used by food retailers, foodservice operators, cold storage facilities and processing plants. As OCU technologies and end-user preferences continue to evolve, contractors need to understand many considerations when selecting an optimal OCU for their specific application and operational requirements. In a recent E360 article, we evaluated key selection criteria and explored today’s leading OCU options.

Sustainability goals, refrigerant regulations and efficiency standards

To help operators comply with environmental regulations and meet their sustainability initiatives, OCU equipment manufacturers are integrating lower-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that contractors and end-users will need to adapt to completely new servicing and operating procedures. Many OCUs are designed to use a newer generation of lower-GWP A1 hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants — such as R-448A and R-449A — which represent minimal changes in terms of safety protocols or servicing.

But since these lower-GWP A1 refrigerants have degrees of glide, contractors need to be aware of how the sizing and selection process may be impacted. Refrigerants with glide may have a diminishing impact upon system capacity, which might require you to select a slightly larger-horsepower OCU — and unit cooler/evaporator — to meet your refrigeration load requirements.

As safety standards and building codes evolve over the next few years, mildly flammable A2Ls will likely be added to the list of refrigerant alternatives used in OCUs. Today, Emerson is actively qualifying our OCUs for use with A2Ls and will be ready to support operators seeking even lower-GWP A2L options when they are approved.

When it comes to OCU use in WICFs, refrigerants are only part of the sustainability equation. Per the Department of Energy’s (DOE) 2020 rule, WICFs must meet 20–40 percent energy reductions on new and retrofit systems below 3,000 square feet. To calculate the energy efficiency of a complete WICF system, the DOE uses a metric created by the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) called the Annual Walk-In Energy Factor (AWEF).

If you are a contractor installing a condensing unit and/or unit cooler, you must ensure this equipment meets or exceeds the minimum AWEF ratings based on capacity and application — such as medium- (MT) or low-temperature (LT); indoor or outdoor; and refrigerant type. To comply with the DOE standard, simply combine a Copeland™ AWEF-rated condensing unit with an AWEF-rated unit cooler.

Copeland outdoor refrigeration units

Copeland outdoor refrigeration units are designed to comply with regulations and provide sustainable refrigeration for a wide variety of modern operator requirements. Combining the reliable efficiency of Copeland scroll compressor technology with variable speed fans, large condenser coils and smart electronic controls, Copeland X-Line Series outdoor refrigeration units provide whisper-quiet performance in compact enclosures, delivering maximum installation flexibility.

Copeland outdoor refrigeration unit, X-Line Series — available in a horsepower range from ¾ to 6 HP, the X-Line is designed for LT and MT applications, such as WICFs and display cases commonly found in convenience stores (c-stores), restaurants, supermarkets and cold storage facilities. It delivers best-in-class energy efficiencies, a slim profile, ultra-low sound levels, superior diagnostics and built-in compressor protection. Offering AWEF-rated efficiencies and lower-GWP (R-448A and R-449A) refrigerant options, the X-Line supports reliable refrigeration while solving many of today’s operational challenges.

Copeland digital outdoor refrigeration unit, X-Line Series — The digital X-Line Series builds upon the field-proven Copeland scroll and X-Line OCU platforms to deliver superior cooling and energy efficiency in MT applications. Providing variable-speed fan motor control, the digital X-Line Series enables variable-capacity modulation to deliver more precise, reliable refrigeration, longer-lasting equipment and lower energy bills. Available in 3, 4, 5 and 6 HP models, the digital X-Line Series also supports multiplex refrigeration architectures — where one OCU provides cooling for multiple fixtures — to meet a variety of modern refrigeration challenges:

  • Reducing the number of refrigeration fixtures and/or refrigeration loads
  • Precisely sizing refrigeration units and loads to an application
  • Eliminating compressor cycling, which negatively affects system performance and equipment longevity
  • Improving food quality and extending shelf life via tighter temperature control
  • Removing constraints that prevent the installation of multiple fixed-capacity OCUs

Calculate the capacity of your OCU

At Emerson, we are committed to helping contractors calculate refrigeration loads and select OCUs to meet a diverse range of LT and MT refrigeration requirements. By selecting the correct OCUs for your customers’ WICF applications, you can ensure reliable, efficient system performance throughout their lifecycles. To simplify this process, Emerson has created a free online Box Load Calculator tool to assist manufacturers and operators to select, purchase and identify the appropriate equipment for their application. Simply navigate to the Equipment Selection tab, enter your application parameters and estimated refrigeration load, and review your optimal equipment options as you evaluate your specific refrigeration requirements.

Refer to Emerson’s Box Load Calculator to help select a condensing unit for your application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Factors Which Drive Innovations Toward the Next Generation of Refrigeration System Design

Katrina Krites | Marketing and Business Development

Manager, Food Retail

Emerson’s Commercial and Residential Solutions Business

The coronavirus pandemic has increased the retail food industry’s collective focus on food quality, safety and sanitation in supermarkets while driving consumer adoption of click-and-collect. At the same time, industry regulations impact retailer behaviors. These factors have brought more attention upon refrigeration systems. In a recent Progressive Grocer article (pages 76–80), I explored how refrigeration products, monitoring and sensing devices can support these initiatives.

Impacting food quality and safety

A grocer’s approach to refrigeration is a fundamental part of creating ideal shopping experiences for consumers. Starting with the configuration of the display cases, merchandising strategies are designed to present food in the most appealing ways. Many cases are now equipped with enhanced controls that turn on lights when a shopper approaches. By leveraging case controls and the internet of things (IoT) technologies, retailers can more effectively keep perishable foods within ideal temperature ranges, thus positively impacting food quality and safety while maximizing shelf life.

Continued improvements in data analytics and cloud-based, IoT technologies are enabling connectivity among equipment and devices, which will allow retailers to achieve much greater holistic controls of not only their refrigeration assets, but also other key facility systems, such as HVAC and lighting. These are areas in which Emerson has invested significant resources and will continue to do so in the future.

Closely related to that are the abilities to monitor and track the temperatures and locations of perishable foods throughout various steps along the cold chain journey.

Acceleration of click-and-collect

If what we’ve seen in 2020 is any indication, the supermarket industry can expect the continued adoption of online fulfillment options. This change in consumer shopping preferences will continue to drive innovations in the next generation of refrigeration system design.

With the growing popularity of click-and-collect, retailers are adding capacity specifically for these cold-storage purposes. With variable-capacity modulation capabilities that can adapt to changing load variations, the Copeland™ digital X-Line series provides refrigeration flexibility and reliability in click-and-collect applications. In addition, its onboard controls can be networked into a supermarket’s building management system (BMS) for complete refrigeration control and monitoring.

Our facility management controls (E2) and enterprise software (Connect+) also help retailers to remotely monitor their refrigeration assets, optimize system performance, and provide data-driven, proactive alerts of potential equipment issues.

The role of regulations

The regulation of refrigerants continues to be a source of great uncertainty for our industry. For several years, regulations have targeted the phase-down of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants to reduce carbon emissions and their potential contribution to climate change. Many retailers face global, national and state regulatory mandates that ban the use of refrigerants with high global warming potential (GWP) and call for the deployment of energy-efficient refrigeration equipment. As a result, the industry is undergoing a shift toward alternative refrigerants with lower GWP levels and no ozone depletion potential (ODP).

All of this has helped to bring low-GWP refrigeration solutions into the spotlight, and Emerson supports a wide range of options for retailers along the sustainability continuum.

Whether it’s natural refrigerants like CO2 or propane, or lower-GWP synthetic A1 or A2L blends, Emerson equipment is designed to cover the full spectrum of refrigerant preferences in various types of architectures. It’s important to remember that there is no one-size-fits-all solution for this refrigerant transition; food retailers are employing a wide range of strategies, depending on their unique regulatory and sustainability mandates.

Many operators simply may not immediately require a drastic reduction in refrigerant GWP and instead are seeking a more gradual transition toward their future sustainability goals. We are helping these retailers to develop equipment strategies that will allow them to transition to lower-GWP refrigerants today, while giving them a pathway for achieving reduced GWP levels in the future.

Energy regulations are also in play, and Emerson is committed to helping the industry meet Department of Energy (DOE) efficiency targets for commercial refrigeration equipment. For example, our recent launch of the Copeland digital X-Line series is designed to meet the DOE’s annual walk-in energy factor (AWEF) efficiency standards for walk-in coolers. These products can also help operators in the state of California to comply with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) requirements for small-format grocery and convenience stores. The X-Line series utilizes low-GWP R-448A and is designed to service a limited number of medium- or low-temperature refrigeration fixtures — making it ideal for small, urban store formats or large supermarkets seeking to add refrigeration loads outside of their existing direct expansion (DX) systems.

Innovation throughout the cold chain

Leveraging the power of IoT, operational data and the software that can extract insights and value from this information will also play much larger roles in future supermarket refrigeration strategies. To that end, continued efforts to achieve connectivity throughout the various links of the cold chain will allow supermarkets to gain much greater control of food quality and safety well before it reaches the shelves of grocery stores.

 

 

[New E360 Webinar] Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

293-Webinar_1200x630

Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

 

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Supermarket refrigeration architectures are rapidly evolving in the face of food retail market pressures and a dynamic regulatory environment. In our next E60 Webinar, which will take place on Tuesday, May 5 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT, we’ll examine the forces behind these changes and explore emerging architectures that utilize alternative refrigerants.

Throughout the food retail industry, supermarket owners and operators are making the transition to refrigerants with lower global warming potential (GWP). Whether you operate in a state that has a legal mandate or are seeking to meet corporate sustainability objectives, many owners, operators and contractors are exploring their current and future refrigeration options. But selecting an architecture goes well beyond sustainability considerations. Stakeholders also must evaluate a variety of economic and operational factors, including first investment, maintenance requirements and lifecycle costs.

The refrigerant transition also is shifting the way we think about system architectures. To reduce refrigerant leaks and system charges, equipment manufacturers are evaluating a variety of approaches that represent more flexible alternatives to traditional centralized direct expansion systems. In our next E360 Webinar, Future Refrigeration Architectures for Meeting Refrigerant Regulations, I will be joined by Diego Marafon, Emerson’s refrigeration scroll product manager, to discuss some of these emerging options. Join us as we explore the latest decentralized and distributed architectures that utilize low-GWP refrigerants.

Attendees will learn about:

  • How refrigerant regulations are impacting operators by state and region
  • The many factors influencing system selection, from facility size and first cost to serviceability and safety
  • Emerging decentralized and distributed architectures and their wide range of applications
  • How a modular approach to system design enables speed and flexibility

Register now for this timely and free webinar.

Six Steps to a Successful Refrigeration Retrofit

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

This blog summarizes an article from ACHR NEWS, entitled “Refrigeration Retrofits Offer ‘Cool’ Savings for Supermarkets.” Click here to read the article in its entirety.

The commercial refrigeration system is the biggest energy user in supermarkets, accounting for about 40 to 60 percent of electricity consumption, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For food retailers, getting energy consumption under control is a top priority, and the refrigeration industry has stepped in with new, higher-efficiency equipment and technologies, such as advanced monitoring and control via the internet of things (IoT). However, for many retailers, virtually all their equipment is aging, and buying new equipment and systems across the board would be prohibitively expensive. But there is another path to saving a considerable amount of energy: targeted retrofits or upgrades to their existing systems.

Some energy-saving modifications can be simple and obvious, such as adding doors to cases. But at a recent Emerson E360 Forum, I explained how a systematic approach to retrofits and upgrades can identify savings throughout a store’s entire refrigeration infrastructure, particularly older, energy-demanding direct expansion (DX) centralized systems. It is a six-step process that reveals the primary causes of energy loss and, step by step, proposes energy-saving retrofits and upgrades to your system that can systematically reduce energy costs without breaking the bank.

  1. Conduct a baseline energy audit throughout the store by installing energy-monitoring equipment. These sensors help you analyze the existing energy signature of the entire store before you make any adjustments or retrofits, and will also be invaluable for future temperature monitoring and control to ensure food safety and quality.
  2. Recommission your existing equipment to factory specifications. This may include adjusting setpoints, superheat, suction pressure and other settings. In the process, any broken components can be repaired. This one step alone can result in energy savings of 18 percent or more.
  3. Upgrade your refrigeration technologies. One effective upgrade is changing discus compressors to digital compressors. This single retrofit can reduce compressor cycling, increase system reliability, and improve energy efficiency by 16 percent or more. Installing variable-frequency drives on condenser fan motors can save even more.
  4. Upgrade your HVAC system. Ambient store temperatures are major stressors on refrigeration systems. Consider upgrading rooftop units and adding demand-controlled ventilation and humidity controls. Integrating the rooftop units with the refrigeration system in the store is another option, creating a self-contained ecosystem that balances ambient and refrigeration temperatures for significant energy savings.
  5. Upgrade lighting and other renewables. Adding modern lighting technology lowers temperatures. Installing doors onto units lowers energy losses. Electronic case controls and expansion valves (EEVs) fine-tune equipment temperatures, while upgrading to electronically commutated (EC) motors lowers electricity consumption while improving equipment efficiency.
  6. Perform condition-based maintenance. Once you’ve migrated to these capital upgrades, it’s important to step up your regular maintenance intervals to continue your gains in efficiency and cost savings.

With these targeted retrofits and upgrades, you can systematically make your centralized DX system more effective in maintaining food quality and safety while simultaneously uncovering efficiencies that can result in significant savings.

Smaller Supermarket Formats Dictate Fresh Refrigeration Approaches

JohnWallace_Blog_Image John Wallace | Director of Innovation, Retail Solutions

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Meeting the demands of emergent small-format supermarkets requires a new approach to — or adaption of existing — refrigeration architectures. This blog is based on a recent article that discusses available options. Read the full article here.

One of the biggest trends shaping the food retail industry is the shrinking store footprint. Instead of building large mega centers that once dominated the landscape, today’s retailers are opting to extend their brands into smaller stores, typically in densely populated areas. The small-format trend is part of a larger evolution — one that emphasizes high-quality, fresh, perishable offerings while appealing to consumer desire for more convenience.

Food retailers that are embracing these changes must also evaluate how their approaches to refrigeration architectures and controls will also need to adapt. Fortunately, there is no shortage of available options to help operators make this transition.

Scale down for “centralized” familiarity
A traditional big-box supermarket has more than 100 cases (a mix of medium- and low-temperature cases) supported by centralized refrigeration racks and controls designed to optimize large systems of this type. If you shrink these systems down for smaller formats with less merchandise, it stands to reason that you may not need as many racks. With stores shrinking from more than 100,000 to less than 20,000 square feet, they simply won’t need the same refrigeration horsepower.

In many cases, operators may still want to use centralized architectures for both medium- and low-temperature cases, but appropriately scaled down to suit the small format. Often, we’re able to design a system with one rack to manage medium- and low-temperature needs. Since it’s a much smaller centralized system to support fewer case lineups, it has much shorter refrigeration lines running out to the cases.

From a system controls standpoint, this smaller centralized architecture isn’t drastically different, so retailers can achieve relatively the same look and feel in both large and small store formats — while also providing the flexibility to scale across the full spectrum of store sizes.

Explore “distributed” efficiencies

While distributed refrigeration systems have been preferred in large supermarkets in Europe and other global regions, they are also well-suited for the small-format emergence in the U.S. Distributed architectures come in different formats and offer a cost-effective refrigeration strategy for smaller stores. Preferred distributed architectures include:

  • “Self-contained” cases (i.e., a completely integrated refrigeration system within the case); also provide spot-merchandizing flexibility
  • Modular refrigeration systems capable of supporting small lines of cases sharing similar characteristics

Distributed architectures also have a greater impact on the way controls are set up and utilized. In a distributed scenario, electronic controllers are installed at the refrigeration cases. Additional sensors are typically required to capture data, allow for better control, and support remote troubleshooting activities.

Standardize your footprint

When adding smaller-format stores to an enterprise network, it may not be in your best interest to introduce a completely new refrigeration and controls platform. For retailers with multi-site networks of large- and small-format stores, it’s especially important to select refrigeration architectures and control platforms that provide a standardized view.

When evaluating refrigeration options, look for platforms that support the evolution of internet of things (IoT) in refrigeration and facility management. These systems represent the next generation of operational efficiencies by offering cloud connectivity, predictive maintenance and advanced multi-site management software.

 

%d bloggers like this: