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[Webinar Recap] Digital X-Line Enhances Proven Condensing Unit Platform

Julie Havenar | Product Manager – Condensing Units
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

For decades, fixed-capacity outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have been a popular architecture choice for foodservice and food retail applications — providing refrigeration for walk-in coolers, display cases and food preparation tables. With recent advances in digital compression technology to enable variable-capacity modulation, modern condensing units offer an even more compelling alternative to traditional centralized architectures. In our recent webinar, I discussed the many benefits of taking a decentralized approach to refrigeration, specifically by using Emerson’s Copeland™ Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line series.

[Webinar Recap] Digital X-Line Enhances Proven Condensing Unit Platform

First, it’s important to review the many reasons why fixed-capacity condensing units have experienced wide industry adoption. Their simple architecture — with one dedicated condensing unit per evaporator (or refrigeration fixture) — makes them extremely easy to implement and a flexible option for load expansion or facility retrofits. By locating the condensing units outside the store, this approach also removes heat and mechanical sound from the shopping environment. In addition, their air-cooled design removes the need for water loops while eliminating excess cost and unit cooling.

But there is always room for improvement. So, we reached out to our customer base to gather feedback about their pain points when using these fixed-capacity OCUs. Common challenges included: the use of mechanical controls; lack of remote communications, onboard diagnostics and system protections; limited mounting/installation options; single speed (on/off) fan cycling; single unit required for every load with each unit individually wired.

Overcoming these challenges became the basis of our Copeland™ Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line series launched a few years ago. X-Line offered the following improvements:

  • Slim, lightweight profile — can be wall-mounted or mounted on rails
  • Quiet — can be located near entrances, patios or residential areas
  • Energy efficient — Copeland scroll compression, variable-speed fan motor control, large condenser coils and enhanced vapor injection (on low-temp, fixed-speed only)
  • Connectivity — communicates with facility management systems, such as Emerson’s XWEB, Site Supervisor and E2 platforms
  • Protection — electronic controls enhance reliability; on-board diagnostics enable fast setup, troubleshooting and alert codes
  • AWEF-compliant — meeting DOE (Department of Energy) regulations

Digital modulation addresses additional customer challenges

With the introduction of the digital X-Line, Emerson was able to address another key customer challenge — requiring a separate condensing unit for each refrigeration load — while enabling variable-capacity modulation from 100% to 20%. The digital X-Line utilizes multiplexing technology to connect multiple fixtures to one condensing unit and detects the required refrigeration demand from each fixture. So, if the digital X-Line were servicing multiple evaporators and only one was calling for cooling, the digital X-Line can run at less than 100% capacity and match the exact load capacity requirement at that moment. This means that operators will need fewer condensing units to meet their refrigeration demands — potentially reducing the equipment footprint.

Other installation benefits include:

  • Simple and quick commissioning — requires only three setpoints: refrigerant, time clock and suction pressure
  • Reduced refrigerant charge and line sets — up to 50% reduction with the option to utilize lower-GWP alternatives
  • Reduced costly call-backs — advanced diagnostics help contractors set it up right the first time

From an operational standpoint, the digital X-Line is designed to deliver continuous performance improvements that impact food quality/safety, energy efficiency and servicing, such as:

  • Tight temperature precision — digital, variable-capacity modulation enables precise control over case temperatures to maximize food quality and safety
  • Energy efficiency gains — larger condenser coils, electronic controls and digital compression (which reduce large amp draws from excessive starts/stop) deliver substantial energy efficiency savings
  • Advanced diagnostics and protection — onboard controls alert end users of faults and KPIs, simplify troubleshooting and provide compressor protection

It’s also important to point out that the digital X-Line maintains the platform’s ultra-quiet operation, which allows the units to be installed nearly anywhere without disrupting customers or neighbors.

Whether you operate a convenience store, restaurant, supermarket or cold storage facility, the digital X-Line provides operators with a state-of-the-art OCU solution that’s ideal for meeting today’s challenging refrigeration requirements. To learn more about the benefits of the digital X-Line in these applications, view this webinar in its entirety.

[New Webinar] Will Explore the Advantages of Digital Outdoor Refrigeration

Julie Havenar | Product Manager – Condensing Units
Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

Outdoor condensing units (OCUs) have been a mainstay for small refrigeration applications for decades. In an upcoming webinar, we will review recent OCU technology innovations that utilize digital compressors to achieve the many benefits of variable-capacity modulation. This informative webinar will take place on Tuesday, June 9 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT.

New Webinar

Commonly used by small-format grocers, convenience stores and restaurants, OCUs have traditionally provided refrigeration for walk-in coolers, display cases and food preparation rooms. By equipping this proven refrigeration strategy with digital compressors, OCUs can provide a greatly expanded role in refrigeration applications. We will explore these new possibilities by taking a closer look at Emerson’s Copeland Digital Outdoor Refrigeration Unit, X-Line Series.

Instead of providing one refrigeration load per unit, the digital X-Line allows operators to service multiple refrigeration loads with one unit — potentially eliminating the need for multiple condensing units. In addition, their ability to modulate capacity per refrigerated load requirements enables precise temperature control and load matching for maximum energy efficiencies.

Webinar attendees will learn how the digital X-Line delivers major advancements to outdoor refrigeration:

  • Fewer units to install and maintain
  • Tight temperature precision
  • Simple and quick commissioning
  • Lightweight and flexible installation options
  • Reduced costly call-backs via advanced diagnostics
  • Lowered refrigerant charge and line sets

Unlike traditional OCUs that utilize a fixed-capacity compressor, the digital X-Line enables continuous capacity modulation from 20 to 100 percent to deliver significant reductions in energy consumption and refrigeration improvements. This advanced compression technology — combined with variable-speed fan motor control, large-capacity condenser coils, and smart protection and diagnostics — provides operators with a state-of-the-art OCU solution that’s ideal for meeting today’s challenging refrigeration requirements.

To learn more about the benefits of variable-capacity modulation in OCUs, register now for this free webinar.

[Webinar Recap] 8 Keys to Understanding the Ongoing Refrigerant Transition

RajanRajendran2 Rajan Rajendran | V.P., System Innovation Center and Sustainability

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

The transition to more environmentally friendly refrigerants in commercial refrigeration and air conditioning applications is underway all around the globe. In the United States, ever-evolving state and federal regulations are forcing industry stakeholders to pay close attention to the developments taking place in their regions. Regardless of your specific location or operational requirements, the use of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants is being phased down in favor of alternatives with lower global warming potential (GWP).

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I recently co-hosted an E360 Webinar with Jennifer Butsch, Emerson’s regulatory affairs manager of air conditioning, to discuss the latest regulatory developments and industry trends driving this transition. For those who could not attend this informative session, you can view the webinar in its entirety. And if you need a primer for quickly understanding this transition, I developed the following list to highlight the key points of our discussion:

  1. The refrigerant transition is not new — In the 1980s, scientists discovered that chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants — such as R-22 — were contributing to the depletion of the ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol Treaty was enacted in 1987 to ban the use of refrigerants with ozone depletion potential (ODP); since then, the hole in the ozone layer has steadily recovered. But the ban on these refrigerants led to the introduction of HFCs — such as R-404A and R-410A — which were then proven to cause global warming. As a result, the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol was established in 2016 to phase down the use of HFCs; it went into effect in 2019 for its 20 participating member countries.
  2. The transition is a global effort — Even before the Kigali Amendment went into effect, other global regions and countries established their own HFC phase-down regulations. The European Union’s F-Gas regulations, which went into effect in 2014, has led the way on establishing a framework for rulemaking. Environmental Canada enacted its own HFC rulemaking in 2017; many of its requirements went into effect this year.
  3. California takes initiative in the U.S. — In the absence of federal regulations, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has introduced its own HFC phase-down measures, starting with the adoption of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Rules 20 and 21. In addition, it is currently working with industry associations and stakeholders to develop proposals to achieve additional GWP reductions by 2030. Many in the industry consider CARB’s proposals among the most ambitious in the world.
  4. States are joining the charge — Following California’s lead, many states have also committed to introduce climate change initiatives, including the reduction of HFCs. Currently, 25 members have joined the U.S. Climate Alliance, which now represents more than 55% of the U.S. population and an $11.7 trillion economy. A few member states have also adopted SNAP Rules 20 and 21 into law; however, each of these states has set forth varying implementation timelines, which will only add complexity to the national regulatory landscape.
  5. New federal regulations are on the horizon — To restore federal guidance pertaining to HFC phase-down regulations, both the Senate and the House have recently introduced new bills, respectively: The American Innovation and Manufacturing Act of 2019, and the American Innovation and Manufacturing Leadership Act of 2020. Both bills align with the HFC reduction goals established in the Kigali Amendment and would authorize the EPA to once again regulate HFCs and establish standards for HFC
    management (servicing, repair, recovery, recycle, reclaim, etc.). The general consensus throughout the industry is that a standardized federal approach would minimize compliance complexities created by a potential patchwork of state regulations.
  6. The next generation of refrigerants is already here — Many low-GWP alternative refrigerants not only have been developed already, they are being designed to replace HFCs commonly used in specific applications today. These refrigerants offer varying GWP ranges and cover the spectrum of refrigerant safety classifications, from A1 (non-flammable) to A2L (mildly flammable) to A3 (highly flammable) and B2L (toxic, mildly flammable). It’s important to point out that many of the lowest-GWP alternatives are classified as A2L, and thus will require equipment and facility redesigns to meet application and safety standards.
  7. Safety standards and codes are evolving — With the industry moving toward the use of flammable refrigerants, the technical committees and governing bodies who provide guidelines on how to safely use these refrigerants are actively updating safety standards. While these activities are ongoing, it’s important to remember that once established, these standards will take several years to make their way into both model and local codes needed to permit the widespread use of flammable refrigerants. The industry still has more work to do before that becomes a reality.
  8. System architectures are changing — This transition is ushering in a new era of system architectures. To utilize low-GWP refrigerants, reduce refrigerant charges and the potential for leaks, look for the commercial refrigeration industry to shift from traditional centralized systems toward more distributed approaches. Natural refrigerant architectures — such as CO2 transcritical booster and R-290 integrated cases — will also continue to expand. Manufacturers are utilizing familiar booster technologies and components to help end users transition to lower-GWP A1s today and even lower-GWP A2Ls in the future. In trials, these systems have provided significant energy savings with reduced installation costs and refrigerant charges.

To learn more details about any of these points, please view this informative webinar in its entirety.

Refrigerant Regulations Update and Industry Trends

Jennifer_Butsch Jennifer Butsch | Regulatory Affairs Manager

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In the United States, the regulations governing the use of refrigerants in commercial refrigeration and AC applications remain in a state of flux. Our next E360 Webinar will take place on Tuesday, March 31 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT and provide an update on the latest regulatory developments at the state and federal levels.

Refrigerant Regulations Update and Industry TrendsThe unpredictable nature of environmental regulations in the U.S. continues to be a source of great uncertainty in today’s commercial refrigeration and AC industries. While many countries around the world are following international guidelines set forth by the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol and the Paris Agreement, the U.S. has rolled back its former federal refrigerant regulations and has yet to participate in these multi-national climate measures.

However, at the state level domestically, things are evolving quickly. The California Air Resources Board (CARB) is moving forward with its stated 2030 deadline of reducing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions by 40 percent from the state’s 2013 baseline levels. While CARB is currently drafting specific proposals on how to achieve this goal, it’s clear that supermarkets and cold storage operators will soon need to accelerate their transition to new refrigerant alternatives that offer much lower global warming potential (GWP).

California is forging a path to long-term environmental sustainability that many other states are following. Currently, 25 states and provinces have joined the U.S. Climate Alliance — which represents 55 percent of the national population — and committed their leadership on climate change initiatives, including the reduction of HFCs. But with 25 governing bodies working toward similar goals, we’re already seeing the possibility of divergent regulatory approaches that would make it increasingly difficult for our industry to manage.

Meanwhile, both the House of Representatives and the Senate have introduced new bills that would give the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to regulate HFCs. With this dynamic mix of activities and new developments happening almost every week, it’s becoming more important than ever to stay informed. Our next E360 Webinar is dedicated to making sense of this turbulent regulatory climate and will provide you with guidance on how to prepare for the future.

This timely and informative E360 Webinar will take place on Tuesday, March 31 at 2 p.m. EDT/11 a.m. PDT. It will be hosted by Emerson’s leading experts on refrigerant regulations: Rajan Rajendran, vice president, systems innovation center and sustainability; and Jennifer Butsch, manager, regulatory affairs. Attendees will learn:

  • How CARB is building upon its Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) ruling foundation with newly proposed HFC refrigerant phase-down efforts
  • How some U.S. Climate Alliance states are adopting the EPA’s SNAP Rules 20 and 21 on their own individual timelines
  • Status of the standards governing charge limits and safe use of A2L and A3 refrigerants, including the potential impacts on building codes
  • Availability of new low-GWP refrigerants
  • Update on the new federal HFC regulations introduced by the Senate and the House
  • New and emerging industry trends to watch closely

Register now for this informative and free webinar.

 

[Webinar Recap] Factoring Energy Management Into Your Refrigeration Retrofits

AndrePatenaude_Blog_Image Andre Patenaude | Director, Food Retail Marketing & Growth Strategy, Cold Chain

Emerson Commercial & Residential Solutions

In today’s dynamic food retail climate, many operators are wondering why they should retrofit their aging refrigeration supermarket refrigeration architecture. For most, this is a not an easy decision to make. While you’ll often find some form of a refrigerant regulation accelerating this process, a viable refrigeration retrofit should also include plans for ongoing energy optimization. In our most recent E360 Webinar, I discussed how to merge these two considerations into a sustainable, long-term refrigeration strategy. Read the summary below and/or view the webinar in its entirety.

The transition to more environmentally friendly, future-ready refrigerants is underway, and as a result, many supermarket retailers are evaluating retrofit options on their existing systems. But for large enterprises or individual stores that consume a lot of energy, the rising costs of energy (especially in certain regions with high rates) are moving conversations toward energy management — not only in refrigeration systems, but also entire facility ecosystems and across the enterprise.

Ultimately, the goal of an effective approach to energy optimization is to minimize energy costs in every way possible. Doing so requires an understanding of the various factors that contribute to energy costs, including:

  • Energy consumption profile of key store systems such as refrigeration, HVAC and lighting
  • Peak electric consumption cycles and periods in each store
  • Time of use rates as dictated by the electrical utility, including both on- and off-peak rates
  • Seasonal changes and their impacts on consumption and electricity rates

This is particularly important in certain areas of the country where charges exceed $15 per kW during peak demand periods.

Why the focus on refrigeration?

A typical supermarket uses a centralized direct expansion refrigeration architecture which accounts for more than 50 percent of its total annual energy consumption, with HVAC systems the next largest consumer at 20 percent. At the same time, an average supermarket consumes three times more energy per square foot than other retail facilities. It’s no surprise then that these systems are becoming prime targets for energy optimization in the U.S. and around the globe.

The tendency for refrigerant leaks in traditional centralized systems — most of which are also charged with refrigerants that have a high global warming potential (GWP) — makes these systems ideal candidates for retrofits. Many of them can transition to lower-GWP refrigerants with relatively minimal retrofit requirements.

Six steps along the “Journey to Energy Excellence”

In the webinar, I cited a case study of a supermarket that went through a retrofit process in its centralized refrigeration system. The process followed a methodology that Emerson refers to as the Journey to Energy Excellence. By upgrading only the refrigeration system (i.e., the first three steps below), the supermarket reduced its energy costs by nearly $40 thousand per year.

The six steps along the journey to energy excellence include:

  1. Conduct a baseline energy audit of the existing system.
  2. Recommission the system to its original condition and setpoints.
  3. Make refrigeration technology upgrades, such as: digital compressors, variable frequency drives and floating the head/suction pressures.
  4. Change the lighting and other renewable upgrades such as adding doors, electronic expansion valves and electrically commutated motors on evaporators.
  5. Expand focus to HVAC technology upgrades, including rooftop units and demand control ventilation.
  6. Deploy a condition-based maintenance, internet of things (IoT) infrastructure to accurately monitor asset and system performance.

Each step enables progressive degrees of energy optimization, and as the case study demonstrates, implementing just the first three steps can provide significant financial gains. Collectively, this methodology can help supermarkets develop energy management strategies that consider entire facility ecosystems.

Regardless of where you are in this process, Emerson is providing solutions at every step to help retailers achieve energy excellence in stores and across the enterprise.

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